JPMorgan Chase to put $3.65 million toward minority business development in Baltimore-Washington area

Banking giant JPMorgan Chase & Co. planned to announce today that it and partners will give $6.65 million to community groups in the Baltimore-Washington region that lend money to minority-owned businesses and entrepreneurs to help them start and grow businesses. In Baltimore, money will go to two groups — The Harbor Bank of Maryland Community Development Corp. and the Latino Economic Development Center — that already have roots in the community and the ability to identify good candidates for loans and technical assistance. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Maryland Local Leaders Stand Behind The Fight For $15

The fight for 15 is on in the general assembly, with local leaders taking sides. Mayor Pugh and county executives are on board, encouraging lawmakers to make $15 an hour the state minimum wage. This includes Marc Elrich of Montgomery, Johnny Olszewski of Baltimore and Steuart Pittman of Anne Arundel, all standing with 1199 SEIU union members to support the bill. Pittman said there are more people who are underpaid that many realize. “We have a high median income up in the 90,000s,” he said, “But they say a third of our population cannot afford the basic necessities of life and that’s a lot of people.” (WJZ-CBS)

Read Full Article

Butcher sues city, says Cross Street Market renovation killed 140-year-old business

As the fourth generation to work at his family’s butcher shop at the Cross Street Market, Brett Nunnally knew the aging facility needed renovation. He never thought, though, that Nunnally Brothers would get priced out of the upgraded marketplace. Offered a lease that raised his rent but decreased his square footage, and after being told the shop would have to close during some of the renovation, the 140-year-old business left in November. And now, it has followed nine other merchants in suing the city, saying the $8 million project put them out of business. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Delmarva Poultry Inc., talks legislation, poultry stats

Delmarva Poultry Inc. Executive Director Holly Porter, along with company President Jennifer Timmons, spoke about all things poultry Friday, Feb. 8, during the Eastern Shore Delegation meeting. Timmons, additionally identifying herself as a professor at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, said on the Eastern Shore there were 1,700 farm families that raised poultry in 2018. For the first time in the state’s history, last year the industry grossed $1 billion. She also said $112 million in state taxes had been funneled back into the economy. (Star Dem.)

Read Full Article

Lawmakers press to eliminate job discrimination against former felons

Former felons could have more success securing employment under bipartisan legislation introduced Thursday that would bar federal employers from asking requests for applicants’ criminal histories before conditional job offers. U.S. Reps. Elijah Cummings, D-Md.-7th, and Doug Collins, R-Georgia, joined with Sens. Cory Booker, D-New Jersey, and Ron Johnson, R-Wisconsin, to propose the Fair Chance Act, an attempt to decrease rates of recidivism by helping ex-convicts secure jobs. (Star Dem.)

Read Full Article

Jumpy market presents first big test

After gliding through years where stocks mostly just rose, a generation of investors last year suddenly confronted a hard financial truth: Stocks are risky and can plunge at any moment. For older investors, the nearly 20 percent drop in the S&P 500 index from late September through Christmas Eve was a reminder of the fear that gripped markets during the 2008 financial crisis, though not as bad. But for many investors in their 20s and early 30s, it was the first test of their mettle since they opened 401(k) and brokerage accounts. (Times-News)

Read Full Article

Retailers are shopping for ways to get rid of checkout lines

Get ready to say good riddance to the checkout line. A year after Amazon opened its first cashier-less store, startups and retailers are racing to get similar technology in stores throughout the world, letting shoppers buy groceries without waiting in line. If they work, cashier-less stores will not only save time but maybe money too, for both cost-cutting merchants and customers whose shopping habits are dissected. From cameras and sensors, the stores will know when shoppers pick up a product and put it down, and can send them a discount to tempt them to buy it. (News Post)

Read Full Article

Produce markets create access to healthy, affordable food

Grace Thorne makes a point of keeping her Wednesday afternoons open. Those afternoons are for going to the market. “The food is good. It’s good-quality produce,” Thorne said as she looked into her brown paper bag of apples, peppers, lettuce and broccoli. The 69-year-old Frederick resident is a regular visitor to Produce in a SNAP, a program from the Baltimore-based Hungry Harvest to bring reduced-cost produce to markets with geographic or financial barriers to healthful food. (News Post) 

Read Full Article