'We won’t stand by and watch,' Toby Bozzuto tells workers amid unrest

An appeal to level the playing field with more opportunity for the "historically oppressed" was made amid this week's unrest by one of Maryland's top developers. Toby Bozzuto, CEO of the Greenbelt-based Bozzuto Group, penned an emotional letter to his employees this past weekend as he watched protests to end police brutality and racism spread across the U.S. following the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25. (Balt Bus Journal)

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Survey Shows Child Care Centers May Close Without Financial Support

More than half of child care providers in Maryland said that they may have to close their operations due to financial losses and restrictions from the COVID-19 pandemic. Although a reduced number of the state’s child care programs are currently open for children of essential workers, these programs are operating at reduced capacity. They are limited by strict ratios, such as no more than 10 children per classroom, to enforce physical distancing and other public health guidelines. (Md Matters)

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‘We Don’t Really Have The Space’ | Sip & Bite Diner Hopes To See Outdoor Dining Transition Into Limited Capacity Indoor Service

Last week, Gov. Larry Hogan announced restaurants can reopen their outdoor seating areas to customers, a step in the right direction, but it doesn’t help everyone. The opportunity to open outdoor seating areas has been a minor reprieve for some local restaurants, but unfortunately, it’s a luxury not every restaurant shares. (WJZ-TV)

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What Dick's Sports Goods' latest earnings report means for Under Armour

Dick's Sporting Goods lost $143 million in the first quarter due to store closures, but the apparel retailer provided some reasons for optimism that could bode well for Under Armour Inc. and other brands. Like the vast majority of retailers, Dick's took a major hit due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The Coraopolis, Pennsylvania-based company, which is Under Armour's biggest wholesale customer, reported Tuesday that same-store sales plunged 29% in the first quarter. (Balt Bus Journal)

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Battle for control of a rural Maryland bank escalates to lawsuit, state investigation

A bitter proxy fight between First United Corp. and an activist investor pushing for a sale has escalated to new heights ahead of the bank's upcoming annual shareholders meeting. In just the last couple of weeks alone, the saga has involved the conclusion of an investigation by Maryland's financial regulator and the filing of a lawsuit. State lawmakers and Gov. Larry Hogan's office have also gotten involved in recent months. (Balt Bus Journal)

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Harborplace's fate grows more precarious amid pandemic

With the 40-year anniversary of Harborplace fast approaching, any kind of celebration at the Inner Harbor landmark has been eclipsed by Covid-19. Once Baltimore's celebrated heartbeat, Harborplace this spring sits in the throes of a double whammy — driven by its ongoing court-ordered receivership and now, the pandemic. Its vacancies continue to mount, workers have been laid off, business phones are disconnected and doors are locked tight. (Balt Bus Journal)

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T. Rowe Price portfolio manager makes case for investing in dividend growth stocks

T. Rowe Price Group Inc. portfolio manager Tom Huber isn't focused on which stocks are performing the best right now during the Covid-19 pandemic — he's looking ahead to 2021 and beyond. Huber, who has managed Baltimore-based T. Rowe Price's $12.5 billion Dividend Growth Fund for 20 years, recently published a white paper discussing his strategy during the current global health crisis. (Balt Bus Journal)

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Stimulus prepaid debit card is causing a lot of confusion

The good news is that many people have the right amount of skepticism about receiving unsolicited mail. The bad news is that some folks may have trashed a mailing that contained their stimulus payment thinking it was just a scam or junk mail. But what they received was a prepaid debit card loaded with the economic impact payments to individuals made available under the $2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (Cares) Act. (Wash Post)

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