Comptroller Franchot questions whether Maryland has investments in Alabama, in light of abortion law

Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot is asking officials to review whether the state’s pension system has investments in Alabama, which just enacted a law that bans almost all abortions. Franchot, a Democrat, noted in a Facebook post on Thursday that he can’t control Alabama lawmakers “who choose to weaponize their system of laws to punish women who are already experiencing great vulnerability.” (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore Inspector General investigating city Department of Public Works trash yards

Agents from the Baltimore Inspector General's Office conducted an investigation Thursday at Department of Public Works waste disposal yards on Bowleys Lane and Reedbird Avenue, a spokesman for the department said. Investigators were seen at City Hall, where their offices are located, unloading boxes of documents taken from the Reedbird Avenue yard. (Balt. Sun)

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Future Of The Preakness At Pimlico Remains On Minds Of Many Ahead Of Saturday’s Race

Along with dishing up crab cakes and fried chicken- owners, trainers and jockeys also had something new to chew over at this year’s Alibi Breakfast; the very real possibility that Preakness will leave Pimlico in 2021. “It would be kind of like if they took the Derby away from Louisville, which would be horrible,” said Sherri McPeek, owner of “Signalman,”. “So I think it should stay, maybe they want to update the facility or maybe build a new facility.” (WJZ-TV)

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Olszewski announces effort to battle opioid crisis in Baltimore County

Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski Jr. is asking a group of medical leaders to develop strategies the county can use to combat the ongoing opioid crisis. The group will analyze public input and draft health recommendations to the county for treating addiction and reducing overdoses, Olszewski announced Thursday. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore Council President Scott to form panel to examine city's cybersecurity after crippling computer hack

Baltimore City Council President Brandon Scott announced Thursday that he is convening a special committee focused on cybersecurity and emergency preparedness as City Hall struggles to recover from a hack that has crippled the government’s email and other computer systems. (Balt. Sun)

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Brave faces and tight lips as City Hall seeks to normalize a hacked government

Officials say municipal workers are soldiering on in the wake of the ransomware attack on Baltimore government computers, but the furrowed brows and workarounds were apparent everywhere at City Hall this week. As spokesman Lester Davis stood outside the office of Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young on Monday and reassured reporters they would still get press releases (“we’re using a third party email”), a receptionist was answering the phones with a smooth apology. “Unfortunately,” she informed the caller, “the phone lines are challenged right now.” (Brew)

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Mid-Shore lawmakers offer legislative session wrap-up

District representatives outlined victories and struggles from the most recent legislative session on Wednesday afternoon at the Tidewater Inn. In the luncheon held by the Talbot Chamber of Commerce and sponsored by 1880 Bank, about 50 local business professionals listened to Del. Chris Adams, R-37B-Wicomico, Del. Johnny Mautz, R-37B-Talbot, and Sen. Addie Eckardt, R-37-Mid-Shore, each offer summaries of the session, with a brief Q&A period to close. Adams spoke to the $15 minimum wage bill and the Clean Energy Jobs Act. To the prior, Adams said “we basically gutted that bill in our committee this year,” highlighting “a tremendous amount of negative consequences.” (Star Democrat)

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Maryland Gov. Hogan, lawmakers call for reforms of UMMS affiliate boards, whose members also hold contracts

State officials outraged in recent weeks by self-dealing contracts between the University of Maryland Medical System and its board members are calling on the health network’s affiliate hospitals to reform their board practices, as well, after a Baltimore Sun investigation revealed similar business ties. UMMS has endured the recent wrath of lawmakers upset that the medical system entered into contracts with the companies of nearly a third of its board of directors — particularly because several of them were no-bid deals. The outcry resulted in the resignations of seven board members, including the UMMS CEO and Baltimore’s mayor. (Balt. Sun) 

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