Lawmakers consider speed camera reforms

Maryland speed camera programs came under intense scrutiny Tuesday in Annapolis and Baltimore, with the General Assembly considering reforms ranging from a ban of the so-called "bounty system" to levying heavy fines against operators that issue erroneous tickets. Meanwhile, a city councilman leading an investigation into a secret audit of the city's speed camera system said Baltimore's top lawyer has agreed to turn over hundreds of pages of documents to the committee conducting the probe. (Balt. Sun)

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With filing deadline a week away, some offices don't have enough candidates for primary election

With the deadline to file to be on the ballot in the June primary election a week from Tuesday, some offices by Monday had not drawn enough candidates to hold a primary election. As of Monday, Stan Stouffer and Mindy Marsden were the only two candidates who had filed for the three Washington County Board of Education seats up for grabs in 2014, according to county Elections Director Kaye Robucci. (Herald-Mail)

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Lack of exposure a hurdle for Montgomery County Council challengers

If you’re hurrying into a Metro station to catch a morning train or driving by one of the county’s busier intersections in the months leading up to the June 24 primary election, you may see Shelly Skolnick. As a Republican running for an at-large seat on the Montgomery County Council, Skolnick, of Silver Spring, isn’t expecting a lot of opposition for his party’s nomination in a county where registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by a ratio of about 3-1. (Gazette)

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Shane Mattingly running for state's attorney

Shane Mattingly, a lawyer in Leonardtown, has filed as a Democratic candidate to be St. Mary’s state’s attorney, contesting a bid by incumbent prosecutor Richard Fritz (R) for a fifth term. Mattingly said Monday that he would seek community input on how to address a lethal surge in heroin addiction in the county, going beyond the current “hammer” approach of prosecution and incarceration. (Enterprise)

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Feb. 18 // Most Marylanders back raising minimum wage

By a wide margin, Maryland voters want to raise the state's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, a poll conducted for The Baltimore Sun shows. A majority of voters in every region of the state supports that wage increase, and the proposal has near-unanimous support from African-Americans, according to the poll. On another issue in Annapolis, the poll found that a majority of voters, 58 percent, supports changing marijuana laws to either decriminalize small amounts of the drug or legalize it completely, as Colorado and Washington have done. (Balt. Sun)

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Cummings joins call for minimum wage hike

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings urged state lawmakers Monday to raise Maryland's minimum wage to $10.10, arguing that lower wages will continue to strain government programs that help the poor. The Baltimore Democrat added his voice to a chorus of Democratic leaders backing Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal, which would increase the minimum hourly rate from $7.25 and tie future wage hikes to the rate of inflation. (Balt. Sun)

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Governor steadfast on $10.10 minimum wage

Gov. Martin O'Malley is in no mood for compromise and he's sticking to his commitment to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour by 2016. Despite resistance from lawmakers and many in the business community, the governor said $10.10 is the way to go and he believes he has the votes to pull it off. O'Malley is also not moving on tying minimum wage increases to the consumer price index. (WBAL-TV)

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Montgomery Republican candidates propose campaign finance alternative

Two Republican candidates in Montgomery County have proposed a plan to provide money for candidates to mail information to voters. The plan, proposed by county executive candidate Jim Shalleck and at-large County Council candidate Shelly Skolnick, would provide county funds for postage for candidates to mail campaign literature to registered voters. The money would be available to county executive candidates who agree to limit their campaign spending to $300,000, at-large council candidates who agree to a $200,000 spending limit and district council candidates who agree to a $100,000 limit. (Gazette)

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