Hogan raising ‘dark’ money to boost his agenda, stop costly education plan

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is reprising his role as a grass roots agitator, asking top supporters to raise at least $2 million for a lobbying and public relations campaign that would herald his Republican agenda and try to rouse opposition to Democratic priorities. A fundraising memo obtained by The Washington Post emphasized that Hogan’s new super PAC and a related nonprofit “can accept unlimited donations.” The campaign will target, among other things, a costly plan embraced by the Democratic-majority legislature to address inequity in public schools and deep disparities in student achievement. (Wash. Post) 

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Baltimore Rep. Elijah Cummings misses high-profile hearing because of medical procedure

Democratic U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings of Baltimore missed a high-profile hearing Thursday of the House committee he chairs, saying he had undergone a medical procedure that will keep him from working for “a week or so.”  “I was very disappointed to miss today’s important hearing,” Cummings said in a statement to The Baltimore Sun as the Oversight and Reform Committee hearing continued on a bill that would make the District of Columbia the nation’s 51st state.  (Balt. Sun)


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Purple Line will open in two phases, with first part in Prince George’s, state says

Rather than open the full Purple Line a year late, Maryland transit officials said Thursday that they will open it in two phases, with the first segment carrying passengers in Prince George’s County in late 2022 and the rest opening the next year. While the 16-mile light-rail line was scheduled to open in March 2022, officials said construction delays mean the full line couldn’t open until at least April 2023.


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‘Let’s Talk Real Solutions’: Mosby ‘Stunned’ By Hogan’s Latest Crime Plan

A day after Gov. Larry Hogan called on the attorney general’s office to prosecute more violent crime cases in an effort to make Baltimore safer, the city’s state’s attorney had harsh words for the governor’s plan. In a letter to Hogan Thursday, Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby said she was “stunned’ by the plan, which she said she first heard of through media reports. “While I do not agree with the action you have taken, I’m encouraged that you are showing a sense of urgency in addressing the violent crime that has taken too many lives and destroyed too many families in our community,” Mosby wrote. (WJZ) 

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HUD Secretary Ben Carson makes dismissive comments about transgender people, angering agency staff

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson expressed concern about “big, hairy men” trying to infiltrate women’s homeless shelters during an internal meeting, according to three people present who interpreted the remarks as an attack on transgender women. While visiting HUD’s San Francisco office this week, Carson also lamented that society no longer seemed to know the difference between men and women, two of the agency staffers said. (Wash. Post) 

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Bowser pushes hard for statehood even though it won’t be achieved — for now.

Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) spared no effort this week in using the D.C. statehood hearing as a way to put herself in the spotlight as a champion of the cause. She staged a parade that, though poorly attended, got attention Monday because of scores of American flags with a 51st star symbolizing the District’s hopes. She beamed as she delivered high-fives to supporters at the Wilson Building and on Capitol Hill. (Wash. Post) 

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Solving Baltimore’s squeegee problem: City leaders have tried for decades. Can they get it right this time?

As the city and its business and nonprofit community prepare to try again for a solution, some have concluded that developing meaningful public policy and programs for “squeegee kids” is as complex as solving poverty itself. (Balt. Sun)

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Hogan asks administrative law judges to help draft compensation plan for exonerees

Gov. Larry Hogan Wednesday said he will ask the state chief administrative law judge to help develop a process to compensate five men who were incarcerated for crimes they did not commit. Hogan made the announcement two weeks after nearly four dozen lawmakers sent a letter to the governor and the Board of Public Works asking the panel to resolve the petitions. (Daily Record)

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