Harris should join in calling on the president to honor Capital Gazette reporter

Given the partisan times we live in, we cannot imagine a more important signature right now than that of U.S. Rep. Andy Harris. Harris, a Baltimore County Republican whose district stretches to the Eastern Shore, is the lone holdout on a letter to President Donald J. Trump urging him to posthumously award Capital Gazette reporter Wendi Winters the Presidential Medal of Freedom. (Capital)

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Peter Schmuck: Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred is sick and tired of the MASN dispute. Well, who isn't?

Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred clearly is sick and tired of the TV rights fee dispute between the Orioles and the Washington Nationals, and he is not alone. The Orioles, who once seemed willing to fight to the death to preserve their stranglehold on a very large percentage of the revenue derived from the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network, have made a recent and unsuccessful attempt to settle the case. (Balt. Sun)

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Jonathan Rogers: The daily hassles of life in Baltimore

I was born in Baltimore. I have lived here pretty much my entire life. I love it. I defend it to critics. But Baltimore has problems. I’m not referring to the well-documented (and hugely important) problems of our murder rate or crime in general. I’m not referring to drugs, gangs or problems with our schools. I’m referring to the everyday annoyances of living in Baltimore. These are not things that affect public safety, but they do affect public happiness. They are the day-in and day-out hassles of life, and in Baltimore, it feels like they’re getting worse. What’s worse: All of these headaches are avoidable. (Balt. Sun)

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July 17 // Hogan's business conflicts just like Trump's? Not quite.

The Maryland Democratic Party contends that Gov. Larry Hogan’s decision not to divest entirely from his real estate business and to place his companies under his brother’s management while in office is exactly the same as President Donald Trump’s choice to put his children in charge of his real estate empire. We’ll grant the superficial similarity — both men work in real estate, both put family members in charge, and both opted for something short of a blind trust — but the reality is that the two situations are worlds apart. (Balt. Sun)

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Finally, Anne Arundel's watershed program gets to the good stuff

Finally, we get to the good stuff in watershed restoration. Anne Arundel County is about to embark on its most ambitious project yet in the multiyear effort to clean up its waterways by addressing decades of stormwater runoff pollution. For anyone who hasn’t seen the stormwater sluice on Furnace Creek in Glen Burnie, it is something of an engineering marvel. Or at least it was when it was built in the 1960s. It is essentially a cement roadway for water to run straight into the creek— filled with trash, sediment and other pollutants that have made the north county waterway a mess. (Capital)

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David Zurawik: FCC call for new hearing on Sinclair is very bad news for Baltimore broadcaster

It looks like Sinclair, the right-wing Baltimore-based broadcast group, might have finally gone too far in trying to end-run rules put in place by Congress to ensure diversity and some local ownership of TV stations. Ajit Pai, the chair of the Federal Communications Commission who earlier this year was pilloried for reversing net neutrality, surprised many in the media world Monday by announcing that he had “serious concerns” about the deal by Sinclair to take over Tribune Media and was referring it for a hearing and further review before an administrative law judge. Some analysts see such a move as a deal killer. I wouldn’t go that far at this point, but the statement from Pai sent Sinclair stocks tumbling 6.5 percent in morning trading, while Tribune dropped 15 percent. (Balt. Sun)

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Matt Micciche: Is it time to retire Advanced Placement classes?

The national conversation surrounding Advanced Placement (AP) classes and their role in preparing high school students for the future took an interesting turn recently when eight prominent Washington, D.C., independent schools jointly announced that they will soon terminate their AP programs. The recognition by these schools — and the numerous others, such as Phillips Andover Academy in Massachusetts and Choate Rosemary Hall in Connecticut, which have made similar decisions in recent years — of the limitations that AP courses impose on the pursuit of educational excellence is a welcome development, and one we hope more of our colleagues will choose to emulate. (Balt. Sun)

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Jake Hamel: Baltimore immigrants are opening fewer businesses than immigrants in other cities

Wanted: new neighbors — and maybe a new neighborhood too. That was the message five years ago when former Mayor of Baltimore Stephanie Rawlings-Blake convened a group of local policymakers, businesses and non-profit leaders collectively known as the New American Task Force to discuss the future of immigrants in Baltimore. There were high hopes that the city’s growing immigrant population would help revitalize some of the city’s roughest neighborhoods, putting families back in homes, citizens back on the sidewalks and businesses back in storefronts. To help reach that future, Ms. Rawlings-Blake established the Mayor’s Office for Immigrant and Multicultural Affairs to much fanfare. (Balt. Sun)

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