Baltimore Civilian Review Board Chairman Bridal Pearson: We need more authority to oversee police

The Civilian Review Board (CRB) of Baltimore City is the only entity authorized to conduct independent investigations of alleged police misconduct filed by members of the public, yet we appear to have a public relations problem. I am the presiding chair of the CRB; I find it imperative to make known a few of my observations about the board as they relate to the public and the Baltimore Police Department (BPD). (Balt. Sun)

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Bob Culver: Give Wicomico's tuition scholarship time to work before changing it

I’m always amazed when people call for change, yet keep doing the same thing while expecting different results. When I ran for county executive, one of my major topics was jobs. While it is true we lost many jobs during the recession, we also lost the companies that offered those jobs. When I would go out to talk to companies about locating to Wicomico County, the single most important theme their chief executive officers spoke of was an increased need for workforce training in college-level courses, especially in technical fields. With that, I worked with Ray Hoy of Wor-Wic Community College to help find a solution. (Daily Times)

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A school volunteer abused at least 23 children. Officials ignored it.

Ever since a Prince George's County school volunteer was arrested in February and charged with the serial sexual abuse of at least 23 elementary-age children, parents have wanted to know what went wrong. How could such horrific crimes occur, during school hours and on school property? Why did no one notice? Or do something? School officials have not been forthcoming, but information revealed in a lawsuit against the system provides troubling answers. Not only were there warning signs — lots of them — but they were ignored. (Wash. Post)

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Annapolis council should consider term limits

Congratulations to Fred Paone and Ross Arnett, the two incumbent Annapolis aldermen who had to wait a week to find out if their constituents wanted them to serve another term. One is a Republican and one a Democrat. Both are City Council veterans who can look at their combined 100-vote margin of victory as confirmation of public confidence. The aldermen now are the perfect, bipartisan, experienced team to launch a discussion of term limits for the council. (Capital)

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Dan Rodricks: 'What do we do to get our city back?'

Few things wound the soul of a city like the death of a public servant, a police officer or firefighter, and especially a police officer doing what Detective Sean Suiter was doing the other day when he was killed — trying to solve a homicide in a city riddled with violence. Baltimore has so many scars now, and so many inflicted in just the last three years: the shooting death of little McKenzie Elliott in Waverly in 2014, the rioting of April 2015, the opioid epidemic, the escalation of gun madness and the insane per-capita rate of killing, with 300-plus homicides per year. Now, the death of a detective, married with five children. God help us. (Balt. Sun)

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Politics of insult no way to build a party

American elections have produced enough bile to fill the Chesapeake Bay and enough lies and distortions to jam every shelf in the Library of Congress. But on the local level, gratuitous insults are shortsighted at best and counterproductive at worst. When voters actually know the candidates — in many cases having met them face-to-face on their doorsteps — crude attempts at insults or caricature backfire. They signal that, first, either you don’t have a serious case to make or are not confident it will stick, and, second, you think the electorate is best addressed as a bunch of children. Voters tend to resent this. (Capital)

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Steuart Pittman: Time to consider 'leaps and bounds' growth Schuh talks about

I received a campaign fundraising letter in the mail recently from County Executive Steve Schuh. It said, "Anne Arundel County is growing by leaps and bounds. We have a diverse economic base that will fuel our growth going forward, as long as we continue with a pro-growth agenda." That letter came during the week Schuh's staff was promoting a $36 million tax break for the casino's hotel and conference center, and opposing a $2,500 property tax credit that would encourage our public safety officers to live in the county. The county executive is right that we have a diverse economic base that is fueling growth. Why would anybody believe developers need taxpayer-funded gifts to lure them to put stakes in our ground? (Capital)

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Pay as you throw model is trash collection method of Carroll's 'FuTuRe'

Slow progress is still progress. Earlier this week, the Board of County Commissioners unanimously voted to move a trash collection model that treats garbage like a metered utility to the public engagement phase. For years known as the pay-as-you-throw model, it has undergone a bit of rebranding and county officials are now calling it the Fair Trash Reduction program, or FuTuRe. Awkward acronyms aside, we’re glad to see the current board of commissioners continue to support this idea, or at least have an open mind about it. (Carr. Co. Times)

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