The Democratic candidates all say they want to be the education governor. Who's really got the best plan?

In a race for governor where the Democratic candidates all appear to agree on most issues, there’s one that sharply divides them. Each of the seven major candidates believes he or she would be the “education governor,” and they all have their reasons why. The Democratic candidates for governor are gambling on education this year, making it their top priority and promoting ideas that just four years ago might have seemed left wing. (Balt. Sun)

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Penny wise: Baltimore's Pratt goes fine-free

Public libraries are such a fixture of the American landscape that it’s easy to forget exactly why they exist. We take for granted that local governments operate at least one public library in each Maryland subdivision, that they are supported primarily by tax dollars, that they are free and open to everyone, that they are governed by public boards and their use is entirely voluntary (nobody is required to avail themselves of a public library). (Balt. Sun)

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Mayor's push on City Dock rezoning a first step in the right direction

Three years ago we rounded off a series called Visions of Annapolis with an editorial saying the city “devotes about 56 percent of City Dock to parking, with sidewalks and pedestrian-friendly open space making up just 17 percent ...” “City residents,” we argued, “will have to realize they are throwing away a resource — and potential magnet for non-bar-going visitors — in order to hang on to one of the most scenic parking lots in America.” (Capital)

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Dr. Amar Setty: Maryland Is Positioning Itself as a Leader in Telehealth

Connecting consumers and physicians through technology will revolutionize health care, saving costs while challenging prevailing attitudes that “getting better” begins and ends with a doctor’s appointment or hospital admission. Chances are, however, the only health care technology most of us see are heavy machines bolted onto the floor and blinking electronic monitoring devices in doctor’s offices or emergency rooms. Commonly known as telehealth, patient-centered technology involves devices consumers already use such as smart phones. (Md. Matters)

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June 4 // Paul A. Tiburzi: New GBC chair to focus on Pimlico, the Convention Center and Baltimore's image

I was recently honored to be elected chair of the Greater Baltimore Committee, a role I accept with enthusiasm and optimism. Baltimore should be — and can be — the greatest, safest city in America. As the 33rd chair of the GBC, I will be active, vocal and aggressive in working to make that happen. (Balt. Sun)

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A meaningful day for The Maryland Theatre and the community

The Maryland Theatre is the consensus crown jewel of downtown Hagerstown, but for a jewel it has, through the decades, been treated rather shabbily. It was with equal parts pride and embarrassment that the city showed off its premier asset, as the grand architecture was tempered by threadbare upholstery and crumbling plaster. Finally, this is changing. On Saturday, Gov. Larry Hogan attended a ceremonial groundbreaking that kicks off a $15 million rehabilitation and expansion of the theater, which dates back to the days of vaudeville and is a battle-scarred survivor of devastating fires and inadequate budgets. (Herald-Mail)

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If county lacks money for both, school repair more important than Brooklyn Park land purchase

County Executive Steve Schuh's newest supplemental budget will go to the County Council this week, not long after he proposed a welcome additional $640,000 to add counselors, social workers and other conflict-addressing staff members to the schools. Moving faster with work at the increasingly run-down Edgewater, Tyler Heights and Richard Henry Lee elementary schools is clearly a good idea. What we’re not clear about yet is where the money is coming from and how the county can afford to do this and still have $28 million for another excellent idea Schuh has floated — buying an old rubble landfill and gravel mine in Brooklyn Park and using the 160 acres for schools, athletic fields and possibly a regional park. (Capital)

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Hye Yeong Kwon: Ellicott City's Main Street is too risky to reopen businesses post flooding

Once again, Ellicott City has been drowned by torrential rain and ravaged by deadly flood waters. Today’s downtown business owners have an extremely difficult decision to make: whether to risk everything and rebuild, just two years removed from the last flood and with the knowledge that it could happen again. Ultimately, of course, every business owner must balance a wide range of factors and determine their best course of action. But if it were my business, I would likely choose not to reopen until there are radical solutions to rebuild. The Main Street corridor simply has too many odds stacked against it right now. (Balt. Sun)

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