Heroes risk their lives to stop mass shootings. Lawmakers don’t have the guts to pass gun reform.

WHEN A gunman opened fire in a synagogue in California, 60-year-old Lori Gilbert Kaye jumped between the shooter and the rabbi. She was killed, but the rabbi credits her with saving his life. When another man started shooting inside a classroom at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 21-year-old Riley Howell charged him. Shot three times, he died. Authorities said he stopped what would have been a far worse massacre. And when gunfire broke out Tuesday at a science, technology, engineering and mathematics school in Colorado, 18-year-old Kendrick Castillo lunged at the shooter. (Wash. Post)

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Schmuck: Why moving Preakness from Pimlico to Laurel Park might actually be a bad idea

For those who believe the unfortunate chain of events that rocked the Triple Crown series over the past couple of weeks will be the death of the Preakness in Baltimore, consider the possibility that it might be just the opposite. The transparent attempt by The Stronach Group recently to change the working description of Pimlico Race Course from dilapidated to unsafe certainly bolstered the company’s argument for moving the second jewel of the Triple Crown to a heavily upgraded Laurel Park. (Balt. Sun)

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Dan Joseph Commentary: Time To Find Baltimore’s Anthony Williams

Baltimore’s current political and social crisis is enough to make even the most ardent believer in the city lose optimism about the future. But the stories of other cities that lived through and emerged from the kind of turmoil Baltimore faces can restore some of that lost hope. The common thread in these stories of civic rebirth? An end to city administration as a partisan political power struggle and a move toward business-like management. I grew up in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. and remember quite well the depths to which that city had fallen in the early 1990’s. (WBAL-Radio)

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The lessons of the Hopkins occupation

With the arrest of student protesters Wednesday at Johns Hopkins University, a five week stand-off (including, most recently, a one-week lock-in) has come to a close. While there is still something of a denouement to unfold — whether those students responsible for shutting down Garland Hall will face any punishment from the school, for example — the main spectacle is over. What are we to make of it? What impact did the protest have? What lessons are we to take away? First, let’s acknowledge that some serious issues were being dealt with here. (Balt. Sun)

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The reaction to Mary Bubala's question on WJZ says more about us than the question does about her

“We have had three female, African-American mayors in a row. They were all passionate public servants. Two resigned, though. Is it a signal that a different kind of leadership is needed to move Baltimore City forward?” ­­— Mary Bubala, WJZ That’s the question that ended a Baltimore anchorwoman’s career and launched a thousand (10,000?) social media comments. It’s a terrible question. (Balt. Sun)

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Serpick: Time for Baltimore to elect leadership worthy of its people

Many in the Baltimore region and beyond see the scandal in City Hall as further evidence that our city is hopelessly — and maybe irretrievably — lost in chaos and dysfunction. Nothing could be further from the truth. The people of Baltimore are neither lost nor dysfunctional. Critics often focus almost exclusively on Baltimore’s many challenges, including the high homicide rate and crisis in leadership, and pay precious little attention to the resilient people in every part of our city working daily to educate children, create safe communities and help those in need. (Balt. Sun)

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Rodricks: What do we have to do to stop the killings? Everything.

The violence in Baltimore has something in common with climate change: They not only seem like intractable problems, one local and one global in scale, but both can make all other things — things that seem important in the moment, controversial things that provoke hours of talk on talking-head television, the day-to-day things right in front of us — seem irrelevant. Though it’s powerfully tempting to do so, especially on beautiful spring days, I find it hard to move past the rate of shootings that occur in the city where I live. In fact, it’s impossible. Over the weekend, 18 more people were shot, including two small children; seven people were killed in three days. (Balt. Sun)

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Cole: Pimlico grandstand issues are an opportunity, not an emergency

On the night of June 16, 1966, an electrical malfunction sparked a massive fire in the wooden, Victorian clubhouse at Pimlico Race Course. The 96-year-old structure burned to the ground. All that remained was a brick chimney. Yet the track’s owner never hesitated over staging the famed Preakness Stakes at Pimlico on the third Saturday in May 1967, less than a year after the catastrophic fire. One of the era’s classic champions, Damascus, made a strong move as the horses rounded the final turn and breezed to an easy victory over a fast track. (Balt. Sun)

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