Schneider: Liberal America’s Single-Family Hypocrisy

If I asked my neighbors in San Francisco if they’d support a policy that reduces fossil-fuel consumption, protects unspoiled wildlands, increases economic mobility, and creates more affordable housing, they would probably all say yes. But if I told them such a policy would legalize small apartment buildings in our neighborhood of charming, million-dollar single-family homes, many of them would balk. That would make parking even harder, increase traffic, block views, bring rowdiness and crime, make our schools worse, they’d argue. (Nation)

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Pitts: Some people just don't matter much

There are people who do not matter much. That's a painful truth, starkly at odds with our Jeffersonian creed and national mythology. But it is a truth, nevertheless, one frequently proven in actions if denied in words. In this country, by dint of race, gender, class or status, some people just don't seem to matter. Apparently, Tammy Jackson is one of them. (Balt. Sun)

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Schmuck: Contemplating this era of reinvention for the Orioles, Ravens and Preakness

It is a curious coincidence that at a time when Baltimore is struggling mightily to forge a new identity, the city’s major sports entities are all in the process of doing the same. Of course, it’s a risky business conflating the life-and-death problems of a city in perpetual crisis with the issues facing the largest entities that provide its sports entertainment. But the survival of the Preakness and the future success of the Orioles and Ravens could play a significant role in the civic renaissance Baltimore so badly needs. (Balt. Sun)

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Cal Thomas: A solution to college debt

Congress created the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program in 2007 in an attempt to attract people into professions like teaching, nursing and public-interest law. College graduates would be forgiven their student loans if they pursued a career in such professions. The Wall Street Journal reports the program is now in "disarray." Although 73,000 people have applied for debt forgiveness as of March 31, reports the Journal, citing Education Department figures, just 864 have had their loans erased. (Balt. Sun)

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Hogan should move hotel project forward, despite local GOP resistance

 

Frederick’s Republican delegation to the Maryland General Assembly got an earful of criticism this week from an unusual source — the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce. Generally speaking, Republicans and chambers of commerce go hand-in-glove on public policy. But here they are divided over the chamber’s number one issue in economic development — the downtown hotel and conference center. (News- Post) 

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Another racial disparity in how we address addiction: access to buprenorphine

The growing recognition of the opioid epidemic as a public health emergency, not a criminal or moral one, is a welcome development, but it’s hard not to see a racial component in society’s attitude toward illegal drug use. The crack epidemic in the ‘90s, which largely devastated African American communities, wasn’t treated this way. But now that the face of addiction is increasingly white and suburban or rural, the tone has changed. (Balt. Sun)

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Hickman: Frustration over race and gender of Baltimore's mayors should be focused on decades of city neglect

Recently, I was sent through social media a video of WJZ anchorwoman Mary Bubala asking a question on TV about the need for a change in mayoral leadership of the city of Baltimore. She said the last three mayors have been female and African American. She continued that two have resigned, and asked if this signals that it’s time for a different type of leadership. (Balt. Sun)

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Chapagain: College is not as expensive as you might think

When my family immigrated to the United States from Nepal in 2011, we had no place to live, no support system and no experience with the American educational system. We were starting from scratch. Neither of my parents had a college degree. They worked countless hours, seven days a week, at minimum wage jobs to provide for our family. Even then, they couldn’t afford to send their children to college. So, I enrolled in a local community college, working several jobs to both pay for school and help support my family. (Balt. Sun)

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