Jake Burdett: Medicare for all is possible in Maryland

Since Bernie Sanders rose to prominence during the 2016 primary, Medicare-for-All has become a common topic of discussion in political circles. It is often debated whether a single-payer, Medicare-for-All or universal system — in which health care is “free” and provided via the state through taxes rather than through private insurance companies — is too expensive or unrealistic. Sanders made Medicare-for-All a national issue. In Maryland it is now more relevant since Ben Jealous won the Democratic gubernatorial primary on a platform of actually implementing a Medicare-for-All system at the state level. The promise to make health care a human right (no longer a privilege) for all Americans (or Marylander) sounds great in theory, but could we really afford that? (Daily Times)

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Putting schools to the test

 

For many years, American educators, parents and political leaders have been grappling with this thorny question: Just how good are our schools? Almost 20 years ago, President George W. Bush’s administration passed the No Child Left Behind Act, with the twin goals of assessing the quality of schools and improving education for all. Under President Barack Obama, Congress passed a replacement law called the Every Student Succeeds Act. Obama said the new law would aim to assess schools more broadly, to measure success in more ways. Now, as a result of that law, Maryland schools will be subject to broad, state-level accountability, for the first time in several years. (News-Post)

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Tim Rowland: Washington County needs more women in elected office

After examining the redacted copy of an investigation into a 2016 Washington County Commissioners’ business trip to South Korea, one that, it seems, got a bit out of hand, a single fact becomes glaringly apparent: Washington County needs to elect some women to county and state offices. (Herald-Mail)

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August 10 // Paul M. McCardell - Six decades at The Sun: newspaper librarian recalls changes to business, building on Calvert Street

As I sit at my desk looking out my window for one of the last times (I have a direct view of the dome of Johns Hopkins hospital and Old Town and the tower of old Engine House No.6 and cars whizzing up and down the Jones Falls Expressway), memories of The Baltimore Sun on Calvert Street flash through my head. I’ve been coming to this building since I was a toddler, with my father, Walter M. McCardell, who was a Baltimore Sun news photographer for 44 years and routinely brought home at least three papers a day: The Baltimore News American and the Evening Sun and Morning Sun and sometimes a New York Times or Washington Post. Ink ran through his veins, a trait he passed on to me. (Balt. Sun)

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David Zurawik: Sinclair's grab for power, glory leaves it a badly damaged brand facing $1 billion lawsuit

Baltimore-based Sinclair Broadcast Group’s now failed takeover bid for Tribune Media brought it a kind of national scrutiny it had never faced in its history, particularly for its conservative politics. From the moment it was announced, I predicted the deal would make Sinclair the most hated company in America. But I never imagined it would end as miserably as it did Thursday morning for the Hunt-Valley-based broadcaster, with Tribune walking away from the deal and announcing a $1 billion lawsuit against Sinclair for its conduct in handling the deal. (Balt. Sun)

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Mass transit scapegoating spreads to Baltimore County

Perhaps we should be thankful that Baltimore County officials aren’t calling for an end to mass transit in White Marsh altogether amid fears of youth crime. Responding to the recent melee at the White Marsh Mall by asking for more buses around closing time is downright enlightened compared to the recent calls by local leaders in Anne Arundel County to shut down or curtail service at several stations in response to resident complaints (not backed up in police statistics) of light rail-related crime. But Baltimore County Council members Cathy Bevins and David Marks still get it wrong by asking for an end to bus service after 11 p.m. (Balt. Sun)

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Diane Bell McKoy and Damon Effingham: More transparency needed to change Baltimore

In Baltimore — for our children — it is imperative that we all stand together as we work in changing the future. We know the issues facing our city. And we know the strategies that have been used, misused, overworked and unsuccessful in addressing the issues we face: racialized poverty, wealth inequities, violence, police abuse and profiling, and lack of opportunity and access for those considered most vulnerable. At times, we look at “the elephant in the room” and it seems so huge that we are tempted to walk away. But for the sake of our city and succeeding generations we do not have that luxury. (Balt. Sun)

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James M. Murphy: Freshman year can be free online for anyone

The American system of higher education is unparalleled. Our public and private institutions — including many right here in Baltimore— offer world-class opportunities in the sciences, humanities and arts, and prepare students for vibrant intellectual and professional lives. However, the benefits of this system are unequally distributed. A college education is unaffordable for many Americans, and its traditionally residential nature creates barriers for adult and non-traditional students. In fact, students previously considered non-traditional are now the norm. Celebrating its one-year anniversary this August, the philanthropy Modern States Education Alliance harnesses online education to shatter these economic and geographic obstacles. (Balt. Sun)

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