Polluters Making a Mockery of Maryland’s Commitment to Clean Energy

Why is Maryland’s clean energy law subsidizing wealthy out-of-state corporate polluters? One puzzling question in Maryland climate policy is why lawmakers insist that residents and businesses subsidize the burning of black liquor at out-of-state paper mills through their utility bills. Under Maryland’s renewable energy program, residents and businesses pay extra for electricity so that a portion of it comes from renewable energy. At least, that is the idea behind our renewable portfolio standard, which requires utilities to buy renewable energy credits from eligible facilities. But many of those credits don’t come from clean sources like wind and solar. (Md. Matters)

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Why study lynchings of many decades ago now?

With all of the current problems that must be addressed in our state, I was somewhat surprised to read the article describing a proposed bill to create a commission to carry out research, hold public hearings, and make recommendations concerning lynching (“Backers pitch bill that would create statewide commission on Maryland’s lynching history,” Feb. 12). Lynching was a horrific act, and it is inexcusable that at least 40 people in our state lost their lives in this manner. But those actions occurred between 1854 and 1933. There are no citizens currently engaging in lynching, and it is doubtful that any sane person would accept or promote this disgusting act. (Balt. Sun)

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D.C. doubles down on destructive prison-first policies

The movement for a more humane criminal-justice system has been gaining ground in cities, states and even the federal government. From Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) to Suffolk County, Mass., District Attorney Rachael Rollins (D) to D.C. Attorney General Karl A. Racine (D), African American activists and elected officials have been at the vanguard. So why is D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) going in the opposite direction and doubling down on the destructive prison-first policies of the past? (Wash. Post)

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The public needs some way to judge the judges

Just how much are judges to blame for crime? If you were to ask former interim police commissioner Gary Tuggle, he might say a lot. He lashed out at a circuit court judge for giving what he considered a repeat violent offender a sentence of probation before judgement for handgun violations, which meant no jail time. He and others, including Gov. Larry Hogan, contend that judges give out sentences for handgun crimes that are way too lenient and bail that is too low, allowing bad guys back on the street to commit more crimes and cycle in and out of the prison system. (Balt. Sun)

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A new bill would shine some light on police misconduct in Maryland

A Maryland State Police sergeant telephoned Teleta Dashiell, a potential witness in a case he was investigating in 2009, leaving a message for the Somerset County resident to call him. The officer apparently thought he had hung up and was overheard disparaging her to a fellow officer as “some God dang n-----.” Ms. Dashiell filed a complaint, was informed there would be an investigation but could never learn the outcome. “Appropriate disciplinary action was taken” is the only thing she was told, thanks to the secrecy that shrouds investigations of police misconduct in Maryland. Past efforts to change the law, among the most restrictive in the country, have failed, but there’s a renewed push being mounted in the General Assembly this session. (Wash. Post)

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Marta H. Mossburg: Gov. Hogan should do more than play defense against Dems

Larry Hogan is an anomaly. A second term Republican governor in a state where Democrats outnumber members of his party two-to-one, he has managed not just to survive in Maryland but to thrive personally in a year when Republicans were trounced in Congress and in state elections. His latest approval numbers stand at 77 percent; he holds a coveted spot in the leadership of the National Governors Association; and prominent Never Trump Republicans see him as presidential material. (Balt. Sun)

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It's past time for Annapolis council to vote on school crowding bill

Laments over the glacial pace of legislation before the City Council are not new. Yet Aldermen Ross Arnett and Rob Savidge seem particularly justified in their frustration with Mayor Gavin Buckley for seeking yet another delay in bringing important new rules on school crowding to a vote. The mayor asked in December for more time to sort out how Annapolis and Anne Arundel County can cooperate on school capacity — preventing new home construction from clogging schools that serve residents on both sides of the city-county line. (Capital)

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Chris Riehl: Starting school after Labor Day is reasonable public policy

Euripides once said, “Experience, travel — these are an education in themselves.” Truer words were never spoken, especially for those who have traveled in and around Maryland. Our diverse cultural and historic assets, natural resources and recreational opportunities are second to none. Each day trip to Antietam Battlefield, each afternoon spent touring Baltimore museums, each weekend on the Eastern Shore can be a learning experience, no matter where our guests are visiting from. Maryland’s tour and travel industry encourages and supports these experiences, especially for young people. (Balt. Sun)

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