Shipp: No quick fixes for Baltimore

There are no quick fixes, Baltimore. Over the last week I’ve been reminded of that as I observed the kind of euphoria that greeted Jack Young’s formal installation as the city’s 51st mayor; the perseverance of the Baltimore Ceasefire movement, even when violence mars a weekend of peace; and the precipitous sacking of a television news anchor. (Balt. Sun)

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Rod Rosenstein comes to his own defense, and it's convincing (almost)

The last time Rod Rosenstein spoke to the Greater Baltimore Committee, the influential business group in the city where he’d spent the last several years as a U.S. attorney, the audience was mildly surprised that he showed up, more so that he spoke and somewhat astonished that he said anything of substance. It was two years ago, and he was at the center of a national political firestorm for having just authored the memo the Trump administration used to justify the firing of then-FBI Director James Comey. (Balt. Sun)

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Basu: Making Maryland an Offshore Wind Energy Leader

Sometimes we are presented with a unique opportunity to significantly improve commerce in Maryland while also addressing real social and environmental challenges. Such is the case with the recently passed Clean Energy Jobs Act of 2019, which currently sits on Gov. Larry Hogan’s desk for his consideration. (Md. Matters)

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Olsen: We must attack opioid overdoses with the same focus we gave HIV

At the height of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, more than 43,000 Americans died in a single year from the deadly virus. As public concern grew, one boy, Ryan White, became the face of the crisis, humanizing the disease and spurring Congress to act. In 1990, just months after Ryan’s untimely death, Congress passed the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act — legislation widely regarded today as a turning point in the epidemic. (Balt. Sun)

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Trump's China tariff fantasies hurt his own case for raising them

There’s a case to be made for imposing tariffs. Those taxes paid on imports raise prices, making those goods less attractive to consumers and, theoretically, giving an advantage to domestic producers. Just as importantly, they give a country leverage on its trading partner. Raise barriers to our exports? We’ll do the same to your imports. With China, there’s an argument to be made that curbing that nation’s worst trade policies (its failure to enforce intellectual property rights and its unwillingness to fully embrace a free market economy among them) requires this level of sacrifice from the American public or the biggest U.S. trade partner won’t change its ways. (Balt. Sun)

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The 2018-19 College Park report card

Every year, The Diamondback hands out grades for the key institutions at the University of Maryland and the city of College Park. Here’s our report card. Administration: D The University of Maryland’s administration has been reamed out this past year — for good reason. Almost a year ago, football player Jordan McNair died of heatstroke, a condition that’s completely survivable with proper treatment. An outside report found that the administration failed to properly monitor the department and put a stop to abuse in its football program before McNair’s death. (Diamondback)

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Maryland makes more progress on Obamacare rates — but there's more to do

For the second year in a row, Marylanders who rely on the Obamacare exchange to buy health insurance have a chance to pay lower rates. The initial rate requests from CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield and Kaiser Permanente aren’t quite as dramatic as last year’s across-the-board reductions — prices for some kinds of policies may go up slightly, but the most popular one, CareFirst’s HMO, will decline by nearly 9 percent. That’s a far cry from the death spiral of ever-escalating prices leading to dwindling enrollment and still higher prices other states have seen. (Balt. Sun)

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BPD should rethink approach to neighborhood canvassing

The recent news of the shootings of two toddlers in West Baltimore reignited the anger and urgency most of our residents have been expressing for years. It immediately became important to me to do whatever was in my ability to bring the perpetrators to justice. I come from the streets of Baltimore, have lived the street life and completely understand that we cannot arrest our way of our current situation. But when a child is the victim — two children! — it is the straw that breaks the camel’s back and puts us all up in arms. (Balt. Sun)

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