What to expect from the Gray officer trial boards

It’s not surprising that Baltimore Police Officers Edward Nero and Garrett Miller chose to accept punishment rather than go before a public trial board for their roles in the arrest of Freddie Gray. Although they maintain they did nothing wrong, they are now able to get on with their lives. From the public’s perspective, though, it’s somewhat disappointing. The investigation into their role in that day’s events compiled by the Howard and Montgomery county police departments will now be shrouded under the state’s protections for personnel records. We don’t know what punishment they received, though both reportedly faced the possibility of a five-day unpaid suspension. (Balt. Sun)

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Nick Berry: Civility prevails after latest city primary

Primary contests can be brutal. They can bruise the winners and losers, especially if the party’s losers don’t support the winner. This happened in the last mayoral primary when incumbent Josh Cohen did not get the support of his defeated opponent, Bevin Buchheister, although she had previously pledged to support the winner. Mike Pantelides got a gift, undoubtedly putting him over the top. Standard party protocol directs that primary losers support winners. All primary candidates expect party unity to prevail. Had Buchheister won the primary she would have naturally expected Cohen’s endorsement, which he would have given. As an electoral newcomer, Buchheister violated this protocol. (Capital)

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A sensible school calendar for Howard County

Howard County is not alone in struggling to align its school calendar for the next year with the governor’s mandate to start classes after Labor Day and end the year before mid-June, an exercise aptly described as “always a puzzle.” But unlike other large districts in the state, the county’s proposals for 2018-2019 are largely sensible and don’t take away religious holidays that have been promised, an issue that is becoming a flash point in neighboring Baltimore and Montgomery counties. Two major Jewish holidays are retained and schools also would be closed for the Lunar New Year and the Hindu Diwali festival of lights, observances that were recent additions to the calendar in response to community requests to reflect and respect the county’s diversity. (Ho. Co. Times)

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Jan Wilson: Until there is a cure for breast cancer...

A pink spotlight is shown on breast cancer awareness every October, but for patients diagnosed with the disease, battling breast cancer is their focus 365 days of the year. Roughly 4,600 women in Maryland will be diagnosed with breast cancer annually, joining the 50,000 women already living with the disease in our state. Until there is a cure, these women will wage a fight for their lives while battling on a second front as they deal with multiple threats to their finances. Necessities such as childcare, household upkeep, food and transportation become crippling when combined with treatment time and costs. The out-of-pocket cost of living with breast cancer can add $2,230 to a family’s budget monthly. (Balt. Sun)

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Tom Horton: At Turners Landing, Chesapeake Bay's story is writ large

It’s just a crease in the landscape, a gully incised by a hundred thousand years of rains, knifing toward sea level through bluffs bulged up by glacial ice, and augmented by sand and gravel spewed down ancient channels of the Delaware and Susquehanna rivers. Where it cut down to access the edge of the Chesapeake’s bays (plural, because there have been more than one, as glaciers came and went and seas rose and fell), wildlife came to drink and fish. Such “landings,” as they became known during European settlement, characterized the Sassafras. I’ve camped there for several springs now with my Salisbury University classes, and the comings and goings across the little landing offer endless interest, windows into the ever-changing natures of the Upper Chesapeake. (Daily Times-Bay Journal)

 

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October 11 // Jeremy Kittredge and Keith Wallington: Governor Hogan, Don’t echo President Trump on crime

Recently released FBI crime statistics show some cities have seen homicides rise. In response, federal, and some state and local, officials have called for a “tough on crime” approach that research shows will only make our communities less safe and result in more people of color incarcerated. Let’s be clear: any increase in violence is a matter of serious concern, and even one life lost is one life too many. But we need to put these numbers in context. (Balt. Sun)

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Mark J. Adams: Where are the police? BPD’s culture of complacency

I have been the victim of three street robberies and a burglary during the last decade. Two of the street robberies took place within the past 13 months. My experiences with the criminal justice system have caused me to fear the inaction of Baltimore's police department more than the actions of the criminals themselves. I believe the most recent of these street robberies illustrates just about everything that is wrong with criminal justice in Baltimore. (Brew)

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October 10 // Josh Kurtz: Hey Dems – don't expect a bailout from the DGA

How much cash on hand did the candidates for governor have the last time campaign committees had to file finance reports, in mid-January? Gov. Larry Hogan (R): $4.1 million. Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz (D): $1.6 million. Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker (D): $250,000. State Sen. Rich Madaleno (D): $73,000. Former NAACP President Ben Jealous: $0. Tech entrepreneur Alec Ross: $0. Attorney Jim Shea: $0. Former Obama administration official Krishanti Vignarajah: $0. OK, that’s a bit of a trick question, because the latter four hadn’t begun fundraising at that point. But zero is still zero. We won’t see the next round of finance reports until next January – one of the many flaws in Maryland’s campaign finance system. But here’s a prediction: Hogan will have more funds on hand than all the Democrats combined – maybe a significant amount more. (Md. Matters)

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