Amazon’s New York ‘disaster’ reminds leaders to address gentrification

Amazon’s sudden abandonment of its touted New York City project sends a message to companies and elected officials nationwide that it’s not enough to promise to create jobs to win public support for new investments in cities already facing growth pains, analysts said. Instead, business and political leaders need to focus as well on solving problems of gentrification that the new jobs will exacerbate, including housing costs, overcrowded schools and displacement of longtime residents. (Wash. Post)

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Experts: Whether private, charter or traditional, school performance varies

Last month, West Virginia state senators introduced a bill to make sweeping changes to West Virginia’s education system. Two of the most controversial provisions would have allowed for charter schools and education savings accounts in West Virginia. After the State Senate passed the bill, the West Virginia House of Delegates amended it so that only two charter schools could open in the state, and struck the education savings account provision from the bill. The House of Delegates passed its version last week. But now the Senate and House have to agree on one version of the bill, so the bill is likely to change again. (Times-News)

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Now that we've reflected on the Parkland shooting, we should consider Baltimore's every day

Yesterday marked the one-year anniversary of the devastating massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., where an expelled student shot to death 17 people — 14 of them children — and injured 17 more. It was the deadliest attack ever on an American high school. Presidents past and present recognized the significance of the day on Twitter, the New York Times featured thoughtful interviews with nine survivors, and schools across Florida held a moment of silence at 10:17 a.m. to remember the dead. That’s as it should be. (Balt. Sun)

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A hole in the Kirwan Commission recommendations

As one of its members, I am proud to support the report of the Commission on Innovation and Excellence in Education (the Kirwan Commission). Its overall recommendations are big, bold and commendable. But it has one shortcoming that I believe should be further understood and addressed. This shortcoming was almost inevitable given the contentious politics of K-12 policy and funding reform. From day one, the commission has struggled to reconcile our legal mandate to recommend “adequacy” in funding with the realpolitik of “affordability.” Commissioners, one and all, have made compromises to try to achieve the right balance. Still, I believe that in our recommendations so far, true adequacy has been compromised. (Balt. Sun)

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Editorial Advisory Board: Let judges have their voice

Baltimore City judges have been criticized by public officials, including the governor, for decisions they have made in criminal cases. We have written editorials both defending and criticizing judges. In all of the controversies regarding Baltimore City judges and their decisions, one voice has been silent – that of the judge whose decision is the subject of criticism. That is not a coincidence. The Maryland Code of Judicial Conduct prohibits a judge from making a public comment on a case. In 2007 the American Bar Association revised its Model Code of Judicial Conduct. Rule 2.10(E) of the Model Code allows a judge to respond to allegations in the media concerning the judge’s conduct in a matter. (Daily Record)

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Baltimore teacher: 'Our city is slaughtering black children'

Last week, a student asked me where he could purchase AR-500 steel plates. “Why?” I asked him with my eyebrow raised. I studied his face. He wasn’t joking, he was scared. “For a bullet proof vest,” he responded. “I have everything but the plates.” “Are things really that bad where you stay?” I already knew the answer. “I need to get the f--- out of Baltimore,” he said, glancing nervously around the room. Conversations like this happen every day in classrooms across the city. (Balt. Sun)

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Stop coddling the Frederick Douglass kids and send them back to school

In relation to the story about the shooting at Douglas High School, what am I missing (“Douglass shooting no reason to revisit arming school police?” Feb. 12)? The year was 1973. We were sitting in French class at Western High School with Mrs. Weinholtz as the teacher. An announcement came over the intercom for teachers to put children in the classrooms and to lock the doors. We had no idea what was going on. Was there a rapist in the building? A murderer? A fight? We were mildly concerned, mostly curious. We looked out of the windows overlooking the quadrangle and saw about five or six cops with their guns drawn and ready to shoot. (Balt. Sun)

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Zurawik: Hogan looks good on TV, but does he have the media moves it would take to challenge Trump?

Amid growing calls for him to run for president in 2020, Gov. Larry Hogan is saying that his focus is running Maryland for the next four years rather than running against Donald Trump. But he’s appearing on major media outlets like CNN in prime time to say it. Actions speak louder, no? If you’re wearing the TV makeup, you’re in the game. That’s what I was thinking as I watched Hogan Monday night on Erin Burnett’s “OutFront” on CNN. (Balt. Sun)

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