Eric Luedtke: A blue wave on the Chesapeake Bay

Election night was a big night for Democrats and Democratic values in Maryland. Much of the media coverage has focused on Larry Hogan winning re-election to the Governor’s Mansion. And it’s true, by essentially running as a moderate Democrat and claiming credit for the work of Democrats in the legislature, Mr. Hogan pulled off a significant victory for Republicans. But it’s also undeniable that Ben Jealous changed the conversation in Maryland by proposing aggressive solutions to big problems that confront our state; among them: the lack of access to health care, the need for more investments in public schools and the vital importance of stemming the opioid crisis. (Balt. Sun)

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Whitaker must recuse

Maryland’s Brian Frosh and 17 of his fellow state attorneys general dispatched a letter last week to Acting U.S. Attorney General Matthew Whitaker that ought to be required reading in the White House as well as the Justice Department. That’s not too much to ask, as it’s just four paragraphs long. The dozen and half top law enforcement officers simply point out that Mr. Whitaker should not be supervising Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of Russian interference in the last election. (Balt. Sun)

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Emilie Kao: No reason to bulldoze the Bladensburg Peace Cross

Forty-nine families in Prince George’s County, Maryland, lost their sons in World War I. With their loved ones buried in European theaters of war, most of the families could not visit the graves. So in 1925, the American Legion and the Gold Star families erected a monument in the county to them — and all soldiers who gave their lives in the “war to end all wars.” Known as the Peace Cross, it symbolizes both spiritual peace for the departed as well as hoped-for peace between the nations. When the monument was erected, a cross-shaped gravestone was a common, even universal, symbol of service and sacrifice. But America’s religious profile has changed dramatically over the years, with growing numbers disavowing traditional beliefs. (Wash. Times)

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November 12 // Eric Cortellessa: Larry Hogan beat the Trump effect in Maryland

Larry Hogan made history Tuesday night when he became Maryland's first Republican governor to win reelection since 1954. But his party failed in its ambitious plan to take away the Democrats' veto-proof majority in the state Senate. Overall, this means that Maryland's political dynamic will remain largely the same in Hogan's second term as it was in his first. But it also means that, in Maryland, the Trump effect was bigger than the Hogan effect. (Wash. Post)

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Josh Kurtz: The early line on 2022

Who will live in Government House come 2023? Is it too early to speculate about the election for governor in 2022? Of course not! Admit it – you’re doing it, too. And there are probably some potential candidates out there who are thinking about it as well. The truth is, we don’t know what the political terrain in Maryland – or the nation – will look like in four years. It’s not even worth speculating about, especially in the Trump era and in the era of social media, where the ground shifts every five minutes or so. But we can make a few observations. (Md. Matters)

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William E. Lori: Baltimore archbishop outlines path toward reform and renewal in the Catholic Church

As is customary this time of year, Baltimore is again hosting the nation’s Catholic bishops, who are convening here in America’s first Roman Catholic diocese for extensive discussions about the relevance and impact of Catholic faith in American society. This year in particular, because of the severe crisis confronting the church, the agenda, deliberations and outcomes of our meeting are rightly under intense scrutiny. (Balt. Sun)

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Abstract art at its worst: States need to end partisan gerrymandering

There’s a part of Maryland where traveling in almost any cardinal direction — south, east, or west — will put you in West Virginia. It’s called Western Maryland, and it comprises Garrett, Allegany, and Washington Counties. If you combine those three counties with neighboring Frederick and Carroll Counties — five counties that border Pennsylvania and are west of Baltimore — you could get a congressional district. It would be a coherent district, mostly rural, hilly, and fairly geographically compact. Basically an Appalachia district, It would also set up similarly coherent lines for the remaining seven districts of Maryland. So, why is there no Western Maryland congressional district? Because such a district would probably elect a Republican. Democrats, who controlled the legislature and the governor’s mansion in 2011, couldn’t have that. (Examiner)

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Montgomery County should seriously address allegations of rape at Damascus High School

The principal of Damascus High School in Montgomery County sent a letter to parents on Nov. 1 informing them of a police investigation into allegations of hazing by members of the junior varsity football team. It soon became clear, however, that something far more horrifying — the sexual assault of four teenage boys — is alleged to have occurred. The incident raises troubling questions about school safety and what role the culture of high school athletics may have played in the attack. (Wash. Post)

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