Carol Park: Baltimore city should reconsider its proposed ban water privatization  

Whether it comes to schooling, housing, postal service or libraries, privatization efforts have always been met with fierce resistance in Maryland. In the latest anti-privatization episode, Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh signed legislation this summer that would make Baltimore the first city in the country to amend its charter to prohibit privatization of the city’s water system. City voters will get a final say on the matter on the upcoming November ballot. (Balt. Sun)

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Daily Times Editorial Board endorses Andy Harris in Maryland's 1st District

Rep. Andy Harris, R-Md-1st, is running for a fifth term in the U.S. Congress. Harris entered Congress eight years ago. In 2008, he knocked out 18-year incumbent Wayne Gilchrest and Sen. E.J. Pipkin, but lost to moderate Democrat Frank Kratovil. In 2010, Harris defeated Kratovil. Harris is an anesthesiologist with decades of experience who maintains his certification but mostly focuses on representing the district. (Daily Times)

 

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Peter Schmuck: Stronach lawsuit, Pimlico don't figure to stand in way of Laurel Park becoming Preakness-worthy

The sun broke through the clouds early Saturday afternoon and provided a near-perfect autumn day at Laurel Park for the racing festival that has grown up around the Jim McKay Maryland Million. If each one seems more and more like a junior Preakness with the big stage and the daylong concert taking place just beyond the clubhouse turn, that’s probably not a coincidence. It’s looking more and more like Laurel will be the future home of the second jewel of horse racing’s Triple Crown. Not that it would be a huge surprise. Just about everything has been pointing in that direction for years. (Balt. Sun)

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October 19 // Daily Times Editorial Board endorses Ben Cardin for U.S. Senate

Ben Cardin is running for a third six-year term representing Maryland in the U.S. Senate. His opponent is a Towson University political science professor, Tony Campbell. As a Democrat, Cardin holds many predictable positions on issues of concern to Marylanders, including health care, the environment and the Chesapeake Bay. His opponent, Tony Campbell, likewise holds reliably Republican views on various issues: state versus federal government roles, freedom of the press, gun ownership and job creation. (Daily Times)

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The Post’s endorsements for attorney general in Maryland and D.C.

In Maryland and the District, incumbent attorneys general Brian E. Frosh and Karl A. Racine, both Democrats, have used their first terms to make an impact, and a highly positive one. They deserve reelection. Mr. Frosh, a well-regarded state lawmaker for 28 years before winning his current job in 2014, has been an activist attorney general. Having sought and won legislative authority to sue the federal government without prior approval from the governor or General Assembly, in 2017, he has used that power aggressively to challenge Trump administration policies, often in concert with other Democratic attorneys general. (Wash. Post)

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Civilian review board: Baltimore police undermining oversight efforts

At a recent public hearing on the Baltimore Police Department’s compliance with the city’s consent decree with the federal government, City Solicitor Andre Davis disclosed information about a dispute that has unfortunately arisen between us, the Civilian Review Board, and one of the agencies that we oversee — the Baltimore Police Department (BPD). Mr. Davis not only shared information about the dispute but also his impressions and opinions of it. Because this important matter has now been made public, we wish to ensure that the public is accurately informed. (Balt. Sun)

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Donald C. Fry: Baltimore’s other crisis

If you happen to be one of the approximately 24,000 motorists who travel across the Hanover Street Bridge in south Baltimore each day, you are driving on a structure that is standing on borrowed time. The reason: The bridge, built in 1900 and owned by Baltimore City, is what civil engineers deem “structurally deficient.” That doesn’t sound good, and it’s not. Costs to reconstruct it are estimated at $150 million. Baltimore city doesn’t have that kind of money in its transportation budget, so instead it repaved the bridge at a cost of $400,000. Improved, yes, but not the needed solution. (Daily Record)

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Baltimore's squeegee dilemma

People who drive through downtown Baltimore report a wide variety of experiences with the squeegee kids who try to make money by cleaning windshields at traffic lights. Some people are happy to give them a dollar or two, and to exchange a few words as they pass by. Some people habitually wave them off without incident. Others say they have found the kids (or at least some of them) to be uncomfortably persistent, that they have to gesticulate and yell to get them to move on. At the extreme end, some drivers report frightening confrontations — broken windshields, attempted robberies. (Balt. Sun)

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