EDITORIAL: Biden for president - please

We enthusiastically endorse Democrat Joe Biden for president. The Scranton-Pennsylvania-born, six-term senator from Delaware and two-term vice president alongside President Barack Obama has half a century’s worth of experience in public service. He has a solid respect for the democratic process and has a demonstrated history of working across divides to bring people together — but he also has wisdom enough to know when to scrap efforts at compromise and fight like hell for what’s right. (Balt Sun)

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Downie: The new charade around Amy Coney Barrett

Whatever one thinks of a president’s right to nominate Supreme Court justices in an election year, it’s clear that Americans don’t buy Republicans’ flip-flop since 2016. When President Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland, a Washington Post/ABC poll found that 63 percent of Americans believed the Senate should vote on his confirmation. Now, four years after GOP senators’ obstructionism hijacked one seat, 57 percent — including 61 percent of independents — say the next president should fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat. (Wash Post)

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Wolk, McKeown & Cox: Amy Coney Barrett was our professor. She'll serve America as well as she served her students.

President Donald Trump nominated Amy Coney Barrett on Saturday to serve on the United States Supreme Court. We all have had the privilege of being Judge Barrett’s students. While we hold a variety of views regarding how best to interpret statutes and the Constitution, we all agree on this: The nation could not ask for a more qualified candidate than the professor we have come to know and revere. (USAToday)

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Goldberg: A GOP deal with Dems on court vacancy makes sense, but was never going to happen

I’ll confess: There was a time when I would have considered the question facing Republicans a no-brainer. Of course they should seize this opportunity to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg with a conservative. Moving the courts — especially the Supreme Court — rightward has been a conservative lodestar for generations. It remains one of the last tenets of pre-Trump conservatism that still largely unites the right. (Balt Sun)

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Walters: What we should learn from the failed white-elephant project in Baltimore

To err is human, to forgive divine. But to ignore an error or refuse to learn from it is, well, unforgivable. So let’s look at Baltimore’s decision to get into the hospitality business and invest in the white elephant that looms over Oriole Park at Camden Yards — the Hilton Baltimore Inner Harbor — and take some lessons. Back in 2005, then-Mayor Martin O’Malley (D) decided that Baltimore really needed a big new hotel next to its convention center. This was billed as a “game changer” that would help reverse the city’s decline by luring more tourists downtown. (Wash Post)

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Pliakas: Despite her virtue-signaling, Bowser is not progressive when it comes to policing

A month ago, D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) stood on a balcony overlooking the bright-yellow words “Black Lives Matter” painted on the pavement of the recently renamed Black Lives Matter Plaza. She spoke as part of the opening night of the 2020 Democratic National Convention, declaring that “we can’t just paint those words behind me. . . . We have to undo the laws and systems that have codified racism for far too long.” (Wash Post)

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McDaniels: Breonna Taylor decision: disappointing, but no surprise

The message sent by the decision in the Breonna Taylor case: Property, an inanimate object, is more important than a Black life. A Jefferson County, Kentucky, grand jury indicted Brett Hankison— one of the officers who busted down Taylor’s door and allegedly shot her dead during a police raid of her apartment in March — on three counts of “wanton endangerment in the first degree." He wasn’t indicted on charges he murdered Taylor, but for shots fired aimlessly into the wall of Taylor’s apartment. (Balt Sun)

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EDITORIAL: The Purple Line is on the verge of collapse — and Hogan is silent

With the notable exception of Superfund sites and the occasional bridge collapse, rarely are failures of public planning, administration and good sense as glaringly visible as what is unfolding right now in the suburbs of D.C., where a $5.6 billion, three-decade partnership to build a 16-mile light rail line just north of the nation’s capital is on the verge of collapse. (Wash Post)

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