EDITORIAL: Cops nationwide react with violence toward people protesting police brutality

As demonstrators took to the streets in cities across the nation to decry police brutality in the wake of the ruthless killing of yet another unarmed black man by a white police officer, law enforcement throughout the country again and again reacted with violence. They used tear gas, Tasers, rubber bullets, police vehicles and their fists against people posing little to no threat — repeatedly proving the protesters’ painful point. (Balt Sun)

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Feldman: Want police reform? We need independent medical examiners and coroners.

There is a clear takeaway from the video of George Floyd dying while Officer Derek Chauvin’s knee is pressed into his neck: Floyd was suffocated by the Minneapolis police officer. So how is it possible that preliminary findings from the Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s report emphasized underlying health conditions and “potential intoxicants” while ruling out asphyxiation? (Wash Post)

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EDITORIAL: Md. primary: We must learn from election failures

The dates on the vote-by-mail ballots were wrong. They falsely claimed postage was required. Many were late to be mailed to voters, particularly in Baltimore City and in Montgomery County. The Maryland State Board of Elections blamed an out-of-state vendor, SeaChange Print Innovations, for the delay and for misrepresenting the timetable. SeaChange has pointed its finger at the elections board for computer snafus. Meanwhile, some households received multiple ballots addressed to people who hadn’t lived there in years. (Balt Sun)

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EDITORIAL: Trump’s threats to deploy troops move America closer to anarchy

Attorney General William P. Barr on Monday ordered federal police and National Guard forces to disperse protesters who were peacefully gathered in front of the White House. As flash munitions exploded and tear gas swirled, President Trump delivered a Rose Garden rant denouncing “acts of domestic terror” he said had taken place in Washington and other U.S. cities, and threatened to “deploy the United States military” to those that fail to “dominate the streets.” (Wash Post)

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Rep. Delgado:I know how painful racism is. But we can’t give up on voting.

I’ve cried many a tear as a black man in America. Sometimes, it is the only way to process the fact that, in the eyes of so many, I’m a walking threat for no reason other than the blackness of my skin. And it’s been this way for as long as I can remember. I’ll never forget my mother telling me when I was growing up that her one job was to make sure I survive in America — to find ways to ensure that when I left the house to go play and hang out with my friends, I made it back home alive. (Wash Post)

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Editorial: Blaming ‘outside agitators’ a deflection rooted in civil rights era

Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman fit the definition of “outside agitators.” They were white New Yorkers in their early 20s who had driven down to Mississippi, where they successfully organized a black boycott of a variety store — along with James Chaney, a local black man once suspended from high school for wearing an NAACP paper badge — and led voting registration efforts for African Americans, much to the chagrin of white supremacists. (Balt Sun)

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Pitts Jr.: George Floyd’s death the latest example of the devaluation of black lives

“I know you’re asking today, how long will it take?” Thus spake Martin Luther King Jr. at the end of the Selma to Montgomery voting rights march. He went on to assure his soul-weary people that the moment of their deliverance was just a little ways down the road. (Balt Sun)

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Ethical issues to consider when reopening schools

How to reopen schools is one of the most pressing decisions facing political leaders. All children are being severely impacted by school closures, our most vulnerable children most of all. The burdens imposed on children are particularly ethically unsettling. Although there are increasing concerns, it is still the case that school-age children rarely die or become seriously ill from COVID-19. (Balt Sun)

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