Adventure Theatre celebrates reopening following March fire

Even in adversity, the show must go on. The mantra often used in theater took a unique turn in March when an electrical fire severely damaged Adventure Theatre in Glen Echo Park. But on Monday morning the theater celebrated its grand reopening following seven months of repairs and renovations, marking an emotional day for staff and board members. (Bethesda)

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October 15 // Opioid overdoses in Maryland increased 14.8 percent in first six months of 2018

The number of opioid-related overdoses in Maryland increased 14.8 percent in the first half of the year as public health officials and others continue to struggle to get a handle on the epidemic. Most of the deaths were related to the powerful opioid fentanyl, which is often added to heroin and even cocaine to boost their effects without the user knowing. Opioid overdoses accounted for most of the state’s intoxication deaths, killing 1,185 people from January to June, compared to 1,032 during the same period last year, according to data released Friday by the Maryland Department of Health. The total number of people who died from intoxication deaths was 1,325, a 12 percent increase over the last year. (Balt. Sun)

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City analysis finds proposed exemptions would cost affordable housing trust find $1.15 million

Just two weeks ago, housing activists joined Mayor Catherine E. Pugh at City Hall to celebrate a hard-won agreement that she called “historic” — an eventual $20 million annual commitment to affordable housing, funded in part by new excise taxes on real estate transactions of more than $1 million. But those activists said this week that last-minute proposals to exempt some of those big-ticket transactions from the new taxes threatened to diminish the size of that commitment — although it was unclear by how much. A City Council committee passed the exemptions Sept. 27, a day after Pugh’s event, and the full council will vote on them Monday. (Balt. Sun)

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Amid scandals and instability, leaders see hope in next commissioner

Police reform advocates hope Baltimore’s next police commissioner can resolve the “infighting” and “political turmoil” cited by recent high-level departures who described significant dysfunction within the department. The recent departures are “recognized as ‘good apples’ and they are leaving and saying they don’t want to be a part of this. That’s telling you that we haven’t progressed,” said Ray Kelly, a longtime community advocate who has been lobbying for policing reforms in the city. “We don’t have a department willing to move forward and political infrastructure to move forward,” he said. (Balt. Sun)

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Wendi Winters among 6 to be awarded for contributions to Anne Arundel arts community

Slain Capital Gazette reporter and editor Wendi Winters and five others will be awarded for their contributions to the arts community in Anne Arundel County next week. Winters and five county residents — Laurie Hays, Joann Vaughan, Lisa Sherwood, Joe Vitek and Robert Benson — will receive an Annie Award on Wednesday for their “significant and lasting contributions to the local arts community,” the awards group wrote in a statement. (Capital)

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Thousands show up for Susan G. Komen Maryland Race for the Cure to raise money for breast cancer research

Rain did not stop thousands of breast cancer survivors and their supporters who turned out Saturday for the 2018 Susan G. Komen Maryland Race for the Cure in Howard County. The rain paused just in time to let the racers — dressed in an array of pink from fuchsia tutus to rose-colored gorilla outfits — run and walk the 5K race around Columbia Gateway Drive. This was the first year for Howard to host the race, which raises money for breast cancer research. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore County considers eliminating monthly tax on mobile homes residents

The Baltimore County Council could vote Monday on a measure that would eliminate a monthly tax that’s charged to owners of mobile homes. The county’s roughly 2,600 mobile home owners have been paying the $20-a-month tax for decades, while residents of conventional homes and apartments do not. That strikes County Councilwoman Cathy Bevins as unfair. The bill she’s sponsoring to eliminate the tax is scheduled for a vote at Monday’s council meeting. The measure, which would cost the county an estimated $600,000 a year in revenue, is opposed by County Executive Don Mohler’s administration. (Balt. Sun)

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Md. juvenile detention center uses yoga to teach mindfulness

Ten young men file into the gym, wearing identical maroon polos, white undershirts, navy sweats, white socks and black, laceless shoes. Soon, they’re removing those shoes and placing them behind 10 royal-blue yoga mats, rolled out on the basketball court floor. The two instructors lead the boys in slow, calming breaths, and show them how to roll their heads in lethargic circles to stretch and loosen up their necks. “Do what’s comfortable for you,” one says. If not for the guards, this could be any school gym — but the yoga and mindfulness class that’s about to begin serves boys in a secure detention center in Baltimore. (Daily Record)

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