Howard County residents weigh-in on local delegation’s state bills

Members of Howard County’s state delegation listened as residents gave their input Wednesday night on the 23 local bills they have proposed for the upcoming 2018 General Assembly legislative session. The bills include a variety of issues, ranging from the creation of grants for local projects like an Ellicott City Public Arts Project to raising the Howard County sheriff's salary from $94,000 to $145,000 in 2019 and establishing a student loan assistance program for county teachers. A number of community members weighed in on proposed legislation to increase developers’ facilities surcharge for building on land in areas where schools are over-enrolled. (Columbia Flier)

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With prosecutions over, six Baltimore officers back at work after death of Freddie Gray

One officer now patrols the Baltimore waterfront. Another works with the unit that polices the city in helicopters. A third officer, now a detective, investigates powerful drug rings. Today, all six officers who were charged in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray case are back on duty. None are back to patrolling the streets of West Baltimore, where Gray was arrested in 2015 and suffered a severe injury in the back of a police van. “They were offered positions outside the patrol division, and they’re satisfied with their assignments,” said Michael Davey, the attorney for the union that represents Baltimore police officers. (Balt. Sun)

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Feds: Indicted gun task force officer planted drugs, duped Baltimore Det. Suiter into finding them

Two powerful Baltimore city councilmen on Thursday called for the police department to turn over the investigation into the unsolved killing of Det. Sean Suiter to federal authorities. The move came hours before federal authorities filed a new indictment against Sgt. Wayne Jenkins, a former member of the corrupt Gun Trace Task Force, alleging he duped Suiter seven years ago into finding drugs planted on a man after a high-speed chase and crash. Federal prosecutors pointed to the new accusations as they moved to vacate the convictions of Umar Burley, who was released after serving seven years of a 15-year sentence related to the drugs, as well as a second man. (Balt. Sun)

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November 30 // Slain Baltimore Detective Sean Suiter remembered at funeral service as hero, caring public servant

Sean Suiter, the 43-year-old Baltimore homicide detective who was killed two weeks ago while investigating a triple-murder on the city’s west side, was remembered Wednesday at a funeral attended by thousands. Suiter had a “unique ability to calm witnesses and family members,” Police Commissioner Kevin Davis said, reading excerpts from the officer’s performance evaluations. He was who his peers in the Western District consulted before their supervisors, an officer who kept an “immaculate” appearance – an extension of his years in the military – and who mentored youthful offenders. (Balt. Sun)

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Worst Bay polluters in seven states? Baltimore’s own sewage plants

A new report documenting how sewage treatment plants in seven states pollute the Chesapeake Bay finds that the two worst offenders are located in Baltimore and owned by the city: The Patapsco and Back River Wastewater Treatment Plants. Violations at the 77-year-old Patapsco plant, located near Curtis Bay, stretch back years, state and city records reviewed by the Environmental Integrity Project (EIP) show. “The problems include sewage overflows, illegal bacteria and phosphorus discharges into the Patapsco River and globs of foul-smelling fat and grease being released into the waterway because skimmers on treatment tanks failed (a recurring problem),” EIP said. (Brew)

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$20.3M to improve safety for bicyclists in Md.

Maryland's transportation secretary has announced $20.3 million in grants to fund safety improvements for bicyclists and pedestrians across the state. Transportation Secretary Pete Rahn says in a Wednesday statement that three state and federal programs will provide grants for 43 projects. The statement says nearly $18 million in federal funding is from the Transportation Alternatives Program, which is designed to boost projects for walking and bicycling access.  Some $2.1 million in state funds comes from the Maryland Bikeways Program. (WMAR-AP)

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Aberdeen council accepts $50,000 offer on former Moose Lodge

Aberdeen has finally found what its mayor and city council believe is the best future use for the dilapidated former Moose Lodge that the city government bought for $435,000 in the fall of 2014. The Aberdeen mayor and City Council unanimously accepted a $50,000 offer from Arthur Helton Monday to purchase the property at 102 N. Rogers St. and redevelop it for a German style restaurant returning to the city. The Prost German Restaurant, a once-popular Aberdeen eatery until it was moved to Cecil County in 2011, could be back in Aberdeen — in the former Moose Lodge — as soon as 2019. (Aegis)

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Ocean City looking at new license plate-based parking system

The current parking meter system throughout the downtown area could be replaced with a new and improved license plate-based system to the tune of nearly $600,000, Ocean City officials learned this week. For over a decade, the CALE machine parking system – which features street side modules accepting credit cards and even cash — has been in place with varying degrees of the success. The users enter a credit or debit card or cash then choose length of their visit, then display the receipt on the dashboard of their vehicle. However, the CALE system first implemented over a decade ago in 2005 has outlived its useful life, causing resort officials to begin exploring a replacement system. (O.C. Md. News)

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