Maryland Zoo in Baltimore welcomes another baby giraffe

A baby giraffe was born at the Maryland Zoo early Thursday, but zookeepers say he is struggling to nurse. The 143-pound, six-foot male calf — born hooves first like all giraffes — is being fed a colostrum formula from cows. Veterinarians were optimistic Saturday his natural nursing instinct will eventually take over. (Balt. Sun)

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More dolphins than expected found in lower Chesapeake Bay

Maryland Natural Resources Police Sgt. John Buchanan was flying biologists over Tangier Sound this spring to survey ducks when he glimpsed gray bodies arcing in the waters below. The veteran pilot lowered the helicopter for a closer look. Two, three, four pods of dolphins. He counted almost 50 in the lower Chesapeake Bay. (AP)

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Towson mansion's historic designation remains on hold as new redevelopment plan moves forward

A hearing to decide whether county officials should designate the Bosley Mansion in Towson a historic landmark has been postponed for the fifth time, as the owner waits to finalize the property's sale to a pair of local developers. Bosley Estates LLC, a partnership of Martin Azola and Delbert Adams, is set to purchase the roughly 4.4 acre property from Presbyterian Home of Maryland for an undisclosed amount following a 90-day design period, Azola said last week. (Towson)

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Hagerstown cuts ribbon on cultural trail

Linda Stevens and her sister, Terry Ernst, rested on a shaded bench Saturday in front of a large orange sculpture that is one of many pieces of art along the new Hagerstown Cultural Trail. "It's nice," Stevens said of the trail, its accompanying artwork, landscaping and other features. "I feel like I'm in another town." City officials cut the ribbon on the trail Saturday afternoon after a formal ceremony in front of the Mural of Unusual Size, a multi-story abstract painting that is among the trail's prominent features. (Herald-Mail)

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More than 200 participate in Father's Day race to benefit Meals on Wheels

When Ben Freed was in 4th grade, he ran a 15-minute mile. His father took him to train at a local community college. A few years later, Freed's grandfather gave him his first real road bike. As Freed competed during Sunday's annual Meals on Wheels Father's Day Sprint Triathlon/Duathlon, he thought of both his father and grandfather's influence. Freed, now 20, finished first in the triathlon, taking just more than an hour to complete a 400-meter swim, 14-mile bike ride and 3-mile run. More than 200 participated in the event, held at the South Carroll Swim Club to benefit Meals on Wheels of Central Maryland. (Balt. Sun)

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June 16 // Johns Hopkins researchers say they've unlocked key to cancer metastasis and how to slow it

Hasini Jayatilaka was a sophomore at the Johns Hopkins University working in a lab studying cancer cells when she noticed that when the cells become too densely packed, some would break off and start spreading. She wasn't sure what to make of it, until she attended an academic conference and heard a speaker talking about bacterial cells behaving the same way. Yet when she went through the academic literature to see if anyone had written about similar behavior in cancer cells, she found nothing. Seven years later, the theory Jayatilaka developed early in college is now a bona fide discovery that offers significant promise for cancer treatment. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore Police prepare for Pride amid violence by canceling officer leave

Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis canceled all scheduled leave for officers this Saturday in order to meet the demands of the department's latest anti-violence strategy while simultaneously providing a strong police presence at this weekend's Pride festivities, officials said Thursday. The decision follows an announcement by Davis on Tuesday, after six homicides in less than 24 hours, that all patrol officers and detectives will be required to work 12-hour shifts, rather than their standard 10-hour shifts, and that all deployable officers will be put on the street through the end of the weekend. (Balt. Sun)

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Commissioners table future discussions on proposed clustering amendment amid public pushback

After multiple discussions — including one Thursday that was especially charged — the Board of County Commissioners voted 3-2 to table further discussions over a clustering concept that would have allowed developers to build on smaller lots than what is prescribed by zoning, effectively killing the concept. The concept would have allowed this clustering in the R-20,000 District within the boundaries of a Priority Funding Area. The R-20,000 District zoning — which is medium density — is made up of half-acre lots, according to Phil Hager, director of the county Department of Planning. (Carr. Co. Times)

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