August 14 // Md. county may be changing body cam policy after man fatally shot by off-duty officer

Across the country, it is rare that officers are mandated to wear body cameras while working secondary jobs in uniform. But, in one of Maryland’s largest forces, that could soon change after an off-duty Baltimore County Officer killed a suspect in Catonsville. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz believes that officers should wear body cameras in secondary jobs. The policy issues still need to be worked out, but this is a position that is increasingly rare around the country. (WJZ-TV)

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Pugh launches plan to employ Baltimore 'squeegee boys' at car wash

Mayor Catherine Pugh this week launched a “pop up” car wash program for Baltimore youth. The mayor announced in June she planned to create a program to employ what she calls the "Squeegee boys" — the Baltimore youths who seeks tips for washing motorists' windshields on city streets. Pugh said the boys show an entrepreneurial spirit, and the city could help them open their own car wash. (Balt. Sun)

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Federal funding cut to teen pregnancy prevention programs will hurt Baltimore, health commissioner says

The Trump administration’s decision to cut short a grant program that would have spent $214 million to support teen pregnancy prevention programs will have far-reaching consequences in cities across the United States, including Baltimore. After the program ends next June, the city will lose the equivalent of $3.5 million in funding for a variety of programs aimed at curtailing unintended teen pregnancies. (Balt. Sun)

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Shore fishermen fight federal catfish regulations

A local fisheries association and the Maryland’s governor’s office are seeking relief of federal regulations they say would have adverse impacts on the state’s burgeoning catfish industry. Furthermore, since blue catfish are an invasive species that likes to eat the Bay’s native species, a drop in the blue catfish industry in the Chesapeake Bay could produce more adverse impacts than revenue loss. (Star-Democrat)

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As oyster planting season ends, debate over Maryland's beloved bivalve continues

After the field crew loaded 320,000 baby oysters on board the Robert Lee, Capt. Doug West steered his 72-foot oyster-planting barge away from the dock and toward the mouth of Choptank River. On an early August morning, West drove the weathered boat out of the Choptank, past Trippe Bay, around the peninsula and into the the Little Choptank River. While the day's work went on, potential changes to oyster sanctuary policy in Maryland loom. (Capital)

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Protesters call on Md. governor to reject gas pipeline

On June 30, Patricia and Dean Kesecker of Berkeley Springs, W.Va. were notified that their legal battle to stop Mountaineer Gas from seizing 10 acres of their land for a gas pipeline had failed. A judge had ruled that Mountaineer Gas had the right to take their land through eminent domain — the right of a government or agent to seize private property for public use. "Our family decided not to appeal because our lawyers said it will not be productive," Patricia Kesecker said Friday near Sharpsburg at a protest against the proposed pipeline. "They have taken our rights to our own land." (Herald-Mail)

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Anne Arundel County Council to meet in special session Monday

The Anne Arundel County Council will meet Monday for a rare special session aimed at keeping plans to move the police department's criminal investigative division on track. Police had planned to move the aging CID offices, which house the department's major crimes units, to a building at the intersection of Generals Highway and Veterans Highway in Millersville. But they recently found another suitable space – which county officials say will require less renovation work – and need the council's blessing to move ahead with buying that property instead. (Capital)

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Ijamsville couple behind 'DaddyOFive' videos charged with neglect

An Ijamsville couple that became internet famous for making prank videos — which critics slammed as child abuse — now face charges in Frederick County Circuit Court, records show. Prosecutors are pursuing two counts of neglect of a minor against both Mike and Heather Martin, the YouTubers behind the “DaddyOFive” videos. They filed the charges on July 27. They allege the Martins neglected both Cody and Emma Martin between November 2016 and April 2017. (News-Post)

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