BWI Thurgood Marshall ranked top 10 airport in U.S.

Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall has been ranked in the top ten for best airports in the U.S. BWI ranked as tenth best U.S. airport in the Condé Nast Traveler 2018 Reader’s Choice Awards this week. In their annual comprehensive survey, Condé Nast Traveler examined domestic and global destinations, airlines, hotels, resorts, cruise lines, airports, and other travel options. (WJZ-TV)

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Frederick continues high ranking for LGBTQ support

For the second year in a row, Frederick received a perfect score for its local laws and services for members of the LGBTQ community. The Human Rights Campaign released the annual report on Monday, surveying 506 municipalities across the country. The LGBTQ rights nonprofit scored each place on a scale of 100 on things such as having nondiscrimination laws, inclusive health care and public accommodations. Frederick was one of 78 cities to receive a perfect score. (News-Post)

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October 9 // Environmental conflict dominates City Council meeting

Trees and waterways dominated discussion in City Council chambers Monday night as two pieces of environmental legislation came up for public comment and two more passed into law. The council — sans Mayor Gavin Buckley, who is visiting his mother in Australia — banned polystyrene foam containers, which restaurants typically use to package takeout food. The ban carries a $100 penalty for the first violation. Repeat violations will cost $200. With the ban, officials hope to keep foam cups and containers out of trash cans and ultimately the bay, where their brittle structure can break down into microplastics. These bits confuse sea creatures, which can get sick after consuming them. (Capital)

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Stuck with crumbling old homes near gleaming new school, Baltimore housing tries something new: DIY

On one side of a Park Heights street, a $43 million plan to overhaul an elementary-middle school was well on its way. On the other side stood nine vacant houses, some little more than partially collapsed shells. Baltimore housing officials had been trying to find a developer to fix up the two-story rowhouses for years, with no success. So, they decided to try something the city never had done. Officials secured $775,000 in public money and began to renovate the empty houses in the 4800 block of Pimlico Road themselves. “Time was running out,” said Wendi Redfern-Curtis, a deputy housing commissioner. (Balt. Sun)

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Dispute over equine focus roils supporters of Baltimore County agriculture center

On a farm in northern Baltimore County off Interstate 83, schoolchildren learn about harvesting crops, beekeepers tend to their hives and families flock to cut sunflowers. The Center for Maryland Agriculture and Farm Park, more commonly called the “Ag Center,” is a 150-acre park purchased by Baltimore County about 15 years ago with a mission to educate the public about farming. But volunteers who have helped develop the Shawan Road park and its educational programs say they fear it’s being turned into something else — shifting away from farm programs and instead becoming a center for equestrian activities. (Balt. Sun)

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Public paychecks: What does Mayor Pugh earn?; Here's how she stacks up nationally

Being the mayor of a big city comes with its perks, a virtual key to the city and a hefty paycheck among them. A Business Journals' analysis of the salaries of 56 mayors across the U.S. revealed that the position can pay anywhere from nearly $300,000 in the largest cities to just $8,400 in Winston-Salem, where Mayor Allen Joines' job is a part-time gig. In Baltimore, Mayor Catherine Pugh brought in $178,294 in fiscal year 2018, making her the 12th highest-paid mayor in the country. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Harford council hears public objections over proposed changes to development regulations

A series of bills proposing changes to the Harford County’s zoning code and development regulations were criticized during County Council public hearings last week by some residents as nothing more than giveaways to developers. Bills 18-033, 18-034, 18-035, 18-036, 18-037 and 18-038, as well as Resolution 012-18, which covers the fall 2018 updates to the county’s master waster and sewer plan, were not acted upon by the council at its legislative session immediately following the hearings Oct. 2; however, they could be voted upon as early as this Tuesday’s legislative session. (Aegis)

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Window falls from Exelon building at Harbor Point, injuring 2 employees and prompting inspection

A window shattered and fell from the Exelon headquarters building at Harbor Point last week, injuring two employees and prompting a wide-scale inspection of other windows, the building owners said Monday. An eighth-floor window shattered and small pieces fell to the ground Wednesday, said Chris Seiler, a spokesman for Beatty Development Group, the firm behind the Harbor Point project where the mixed-use tower is located. The tempered glass is made to shatter for safety reasons. Seiler said the company has erected scaffolding around the building so workers feel safe as inspectors go over all 7,500 windows on the tower, which opened two years ago for the energy giant’s 1,500 workers. (Balt. Sun)

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