Howard County teases what the new historic Ellicott City might look like

Howard County today released a teaser drawing of what the “new” historic Ellicott City might look like at the end of a five-year flood mitigation plan that is under review. The rendering, prepared by Mahan Rykiel Associates, a landscape and design firm, depicts a view from Tiber Alley and shows a stage for live performances as well as the blue sign of Caplans, a department store slated for removal. “The positioning of the sign is one of many concept[s] of how some historical pieces could be saved,” said Paul Milton, an aide to Howard County Executive Allan Kittleman, in an email. (Ho. Co. Times)

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Baltimore City Council holds contentious hearing on bringing back police surveillance plane

At a contentious Baltimore City Council meeting Tuesday, residents booed in opposition or cheered in support during discussions about possibly bringing back the controversial, previously undisclosed surveillance plane that police said was used to capture criminal activity. Persistent Surveillance Systems, the Ohio-based company that operated the plane in 2016 until it was grounded by the controversy, wants to reinstate the program at a cost of $1.63 million a year. Company founder Ross McNutt said Texas philanthropists Laura and John Arnold have offered to cover the costs for at least three years. (Balt. Sun)

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Sailing hall of fame board votes to leave Annapolis, move to Newport, Rhode Island

Barring last-minute discovery of structural or environmental damage, the National Sailing Hall of Fame is relocating to a historic armory in Newport, Rhode Island. The hall’s board of directors voted 17-9 to Tuesday in favor of proceeding with its deal to purchase space in the Armory Building for $1.685 million. The hall’s “checklist” includes inspecting the site for mold, asbestos, structural or environmental issues, said hall president Gary Jobson. (Capital)

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Anti-hunger programs in Maryland growing to meet demand

Earlier this year, the Light House emergency shelter in Annapolis was seeing about 200 pickups from its food pantry per month. So far this month, it’s averaging 900. “There’s a real need,” said Linda Vogler, executive chef and director of culinary arts training at the shelter. “People are hungry.” In Maryland, about 10 percent of households are food insecure, meaning they struggle to afford adequate nutritious food, according to data from the United States Department of Agriculture. (News-Post)

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Squish squash: Maryland farmers see meager pumpkin crops after wet summer

Maryland farmers say their gourds are far from handsome or abundant this fall after an unusually wet summer drowned the state’s pumpkin crops. As 2018 marks one of Maryland’s rainiest seasons on record, pumpkins are the latest seasonal joy — along with outdoor movies, festivals and baseball games — to be ruined by the rain. “Pumpkins prefer dry weather,” said Steve Weber of Weber’s Cider Mill Farm in Parkville. “You can make more pumpkins in dry weather than wet weather. It wasn't a good growing season.” (Balt. Sun)
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New Windsor, Waste Zero begin preparing town for trash pilot program with about two weeks before launch

Concerns still remain from citizens and landlords about the Fair Trash Reduction pilot program — a pay-as-you-throw model — that will begin next month in New Windsor. But at a work session Monday night, the New Windsor Town Council, as well as county employees and a representative from Waste Zero — the company involved in the pilot — spent more than an hour trying to alleviate anger and frustration, answer questions, and prepare citizens for the beginning of the pilot. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Md. officer accused of raping woman after traffic stop, leaving after witness arrived

A Prince George’s County police officer facing rape and sexual assault charges directed a woman he had pulled over in a traffic stop to drive behind a nearby store and ordered her to perform a sex act on him, charging documents allege. The officer, who was on-duty, in uniform and a marked car, then told the woman he wanted sex but left the scene after a witness arrived in the area, according to the documents. Officer 1st Class Ryan Macklin, 29, was arrested Monday, police said. He is scheduled for his first appearance in court Wednesday. (Wash. Post)

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Sculptor wants a National Civil War Memorial in Taneytown but promises, 'This is not a Confederate monument'

Gary Casteel, a renowned sculptor and self-proclaimed history lover, has been searching some 15 years for a place to erect his masterpiece-in-the-works: the National Civil War Memorial. During a time when many places are taking down monuments related to the Confederacy, Casteel may have just found a home in Taneytown for his project, which would honor all parties involved in and affected by the Civil War. The 72-year-old sculptor, who lives and works in Gettysburg, recently approached the Taneytown Mayor and City Council proposing a 90-foot monument featuring historical figures from both Union and Confederate states as well as scenes from key moments in the war. (Carr. Co. Times)

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