Baltimore gets $7.6 million from Md. for parks and community projects

The Board of Public Works unanimously approved $7.6 Million for 11 Baltimore city parks and community projects on Wednesday. The series of Maryland Department of Natural Resources items includes funding from Program Open Space Local, the Community Parks and Playgrounds Program, and the Baltimore City Direct Grant. (Daily Record)

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Property tax credit bill for retired vets, seniors approved by Harford council

Harford County Bill 17-021, which gives property tax credits to retired veterans 65 and older and senior citizens who have lived in the same house for at least 40 years, was approved by the County Council in a 5-1 vote Tuesday night. Councilman Mike Perrone cast the lone negative vote; Councilman Joe Woods was absent. Perrone stressed that every tax credit, whether for good or bad, “is a subsidy.” “Whenever we say we’re going to give a credit to someone, we have to remember that someone else is paying for that credit,” he said. The bill, which grants a 20 percent credit over five years to those eligible, is in line with state legislation that took effect in June 2016. (Aegis)

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It's official, Harford council limits public speakers

It’s official. Members of the public who want to make comments during Harford County Council meetings are limited to three minutes if speaking as an individual and five minutes if speaking for a “bona fide” organization, according to an amendment to the council’s rules of procedure approved Tuesday evening. The council voted 6-0 in favor of the amendment — Councilman Joe Woods was absent — but it generated expressions of concern from two residents who spoke during the public comment portion of the council meeting. (Aegis)

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December 6 // City officials hoping to bring anti-violence program to Baltimore

City officials are hoping to put together $17 million in funding to bring an anti-violence program to Baltimore that has a track record of connecting high-risk young adults to jobs and keeping them out of jail. Mayor Catherine Pugh made bringing the Massachusetts-based Roca program to the city a part of her crime plan at a time when violence is surging and a series of high-profile assaults and robberies by juveniles has residents on edge. (Balt. Sun)

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Maryland’s largest jurisdiction aims to eliminate greenhouse emissions by 2035

Wealthy, progressive Montgomery County on Tuesday became one of the first jurisdictions in the nation to declare a “climate emergency,” heeding a call from environmental advocacy groups to counter Trump administration policies by dramatically cutting greenhouse emissions in coming years. Under the resolution approved by the all-Democratic council, Maryland’s most populous jurisdiction aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2027 — and 100 percent by 2035. (Wash. Post)

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McAuliffe says Virginia has done its part to fix Metro and needs Maryland and D.C. to step up

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) said Tuesday that his state has done its part for Metro by urging board reforms and pledging to provide dedicated funding, and he called on Maryland and the District to join the effort. McAuliffe spoke at a news conference marking the official release of a report on fixing Metro prepared by former U.S. transportation secretary Ray LaHood. (Wash. Post)

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Environmentalists ask Exelon to pay for Conowingo sediment cleanup

A group of environmentalists released a study Tuesday suggesting the owner of Conowingo Dam on the lower Susquehanna River can afford to help reduce or counteract the pollution that flows past the dam, harming Chesapeake Bay health. But the company, Chicago-based Exelon Corp., said the analysis is flawed. Moreover, Exelon said it shouldn’t have to bear responsibility for dirt and rocks that wash into the bay across hundreds of miles. (Balt. Sun)

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Prosecutor complained in 2014 that indicted Baltimore gun task force supervisor was not truthful

A Baltimore prosecutor complained in 2014 that Sgt. Wayne Jenkins, the now indicted supervisor of the Gun Trace Task Force, was among a group of officers who had not been truthful in a case involving allegations of evidence planting, the public defender’s office alleged in a new court filing. The specifics of the internal complaint against Jenkins are not outlined, but it dates to three years before federal authorities charged Jenkins and seven other members of the unit with accusations that they robbed citizens, falsified paperwork to cover their tracks and earned fraudulent overtime. (Balt. Sun)

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