Jan. 17 // Medical liability issues pull down state’s emergency care ranking 

Maryland’s medical liability environment is the most significant issue affecting residents’ access to emergency-room care, according to a report released Thursday by the American College of Emergency Physicians — a finding disputed by at least one lawyer who specializes in medical malpractice cases. In the physicians’ 2014 “State-by-State Report Card,” Maryland received a lower overall score than in 2009, the last time the report was released. (Daily Record)

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Maryland Legislature to Consider Rescission of 1860s Pro-Slavery Law

Some Maryland lawmakers say they are seeking to correct a past wrong, and want to repeal a pro-slavery law that remains in effect after more than 150 years. The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution ended slavery in the United States, but the initial proposed 13th Amendment — called the Corwin Amendment — would have done just the opposite. The Corwin Amendment, named after politician Thomas Corwin of Ohio, would have permanently prevented Congress from overriding state slavery laws. The Corwin Amendment was approved by Congress in 1861, and was ratified by Maryland the following year. However, the outbreak and outcome of the Civil War prevented it from ever becoming the law of the land. (Gazette)

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As Towson grows, so do concerns over violent crime

Towson University student Mykeal Spivey was walking toward his off-campus apartment when three men came up from behind, demanded his cellphone and attacked him when he refused. Spivey noticed the blood as he collapsed against a light pole; he hadn't realized they had stabbed him. The attack was one of several violent incidents that have shaken the Baltimore County seat in recent months, and police and community groups have stepped up public safety campaigns in response. (Balt. Sun)

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Scaled-back Monrovia Town Center passes commissioners

After more than a dozen hours of testimony, the Frederick County Commissioners on Thursday approved a rezoning measure allowing a scaled-back version of the controversial Monrovia Town Center to advance. The commissioners heard from more than two dozen people during a public comment portion of Thursday’s meeting before President Blaine Young made a motion scaling back the proposed development from 1,510 homes to 1,250 homes. (News-Post)

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Construction of Ferris wheel for National Harbor already underway

It’s really happening — a 175-foot Ferris wheel is coming to National Harbor.  The approvals are in place, the permits have been okayed and the $15 million ride is already being built, with some pieces being assembled in Switzerland and the rest in Kansas. The National Harbor version will be catered by Wolfgang Puck and can be lit up at night with colors corresponding to holidays or festivals. A VIP gondola can be rented out for special events. (Wash. Post)

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Disability advocates chide Md. first response panel

A state commission formed in response to the death in custody of a Frederick County man with Down syndrome should seek legislation mandating disability awareness training for police and other first responders, the Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities said Thursday. The center, part of the Baltimore-based Kennedy Krieger Institute, chided the panel for not recommending such a law in its initial progress report last week, after nearly four months of work. (Herald-Mail)

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Ellicott residents, county chart course for historic district housing

With several new housing developments planned within and around Ellicott City’s historic district, some residents are drawing a line. Disrupt the charm of the old town, they say, and Ellicott City's appeal could suffer, too. They're starting a petition drive to ask the county not to have a stake in building and renting housing units in the historic district. (Balt. Sun)

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Shank, Donoghue to introduce bond bill to help build Hospice of Washington County facility

County Del. John Donoghue and Sen. Christopher Shank plan to introduce a bond bill during the current session of the Maryland General Assembly asking for $250,000 in state funding to help Hospice of Washington County build a residential facility for patients. Neal Glessner, co-chairman of a capital campaign to raise money for the facility, said the hospice house will cost $3 million to build. (Herald-Mail)

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