Montgomery County and Foulger-Pratt trade barbs over transit center fix

Montgomery County could withhold payment or demand money back from the contractor of the Silver Spring Transit Center because of the cost of repairing mistakes to the facility. (Gazette)

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Sept. 16 // State owes $21 million for faulty Medicaid claims, report says

A federal investigator has found that Maryland's Medicaid program had a 95 percent error rate in seeking reimbursement for room and board for the developmentally disabled and thus owes the U.S. government nearly $21 million. Advocates expressed concern that the findings could lead to budget cuts to the program and longer stays on waiting lists for vulnerable individuals and struggling families. (Balt. Sun)

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Purple Line light-rail system would bring new infrastructure to neighborhoods

A light-rail Purple Line, estimated to cost $2.15 billion, has no construction funding. Even so, the Maryland Transit Administration continues to refine its design, including an extensive rail infrastructure required to operate, maintain and house the trains. That could include 20 power substations, 14 “signal bungalows” containing train-control equipment, a nine-story “ventilation tower” in the Bethesda Row entertainment district, and a tunnel three-tenths of a mile long to be blasted beneath a Silver Spring neighborhood. The Lyttonsville area of Silver Spring would get a train storage yard, while part of Riverdale would get a maintenance facility. (Wash. Post)

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EPA can go forward with plan to limit pollution in the Chesapeake Bay

A federal judge on Friday upheld the Environmental Protection Agency’s sweeping plan to limit pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, derailing the farm lobby’s attempt to stop one of the largest efforts to clean a waterway in the nation’s history. (Wash. Post)

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NAACP, Anne Arundel library consider mediation of discrimination complaints

The Anne Arundel County NAACP and the county public library are considering using federal mediators to resolve complaints about discrimination against African-American employees. Jacqueline Boone-Allsup, president of the civil rights organization, said mediation by the U.S. Department of Justice could be the first step in creating a better working environment for the library system. (Capital)

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Maryland's restrictive gun laws drive dealer to Pennsylvania to make a living

Jim Greer stood beside his desk in the small back office of Angus MacGregor’s Trading Post in Waldorf, Md., and rifled through several papers at the top of a file box. In two weeks, he will be shuttering his firearms business and reopening in Pennsylvania, a state he said is much more welcoming to a firearms dealer than Maryland. (Wash. Times)

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City Homes bankruptcy will not stop lead suits for long 

City Homes Inc.’s filing for bankruptcy protection last week will not stop the more than 70 pending lead-paint-poisoning claims against the Baltimore landlord, plaintiffs’ attorneys said. (Daily Record)

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Domestic violence victims often reluctant to come forward

Domestic violence victims are often reluctant to seek help, which essentially renders the network of resources available to them in Anne Arundel County moot, experts say. That problem was highlighted last week when 29-year-old Ronnesha Simms was stabbed to death by the father of her two children in Annapolis — a year after refusing help by the Anne Arundel County State's Attorney's Office. (Capital)

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