Material from Walters is 10,000th item in World Digital Library

No bells and whistles went off today, but the Walters Arts Museum just won the distinction of providing the 10,000th entry in the World Digital Library, a Library of Congress project launched in 2009 that provides free Internet access to manuscripts, maps, books, works of art, photographs, films, recordings and more from every continent.The total number of images provided by those 10,000 entries is nearly 500,000. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore traffic 18th worst in nation, survey shows

The Baltimore region had the 18th worst traffic in the country in 2013, according to the latest annual survey by INRIX, a leader in traffic data collection.The average commuter spent 27 hours in traffic in 2013, which is an hour more than in 2012, when Baltimore's traffic was considered the 17th worst in the nation, INRIX found. (Balt. Sun)

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Pesticide study funding advances

House and Senate agreed separately Thursday to raise fees on pesticides sold in Maryland to help pay for further study of their use. The House voted 100 to 35 for a fee increase bill, while the Senate passed its version, 37 to 6. (Balt. Sun)

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Owners of commercial property on septic systems may get a break from future state sewage regulations

Marylanders in the process of developing or who currently own commercial properties on septic systems may not have to comply with future state regulations that reduce the amount of sewage they can discharge if a Carroll County Health Department policy is adopted statewide. Representatives from the health department updated the Carroll County Board of Commissioners Thursday on proposed septic regulations for future commercial properties. The Maryland Department of the Environment plans to adopt a requirement that would increase the size of septic systems by 1½ to 2 times the current requirement for commercial sites with sewage flows of less than 5,000 gallons per day. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Liz Bobo leaving politics for private life after 40 years

When the crowd of about 125 people gathered in Columbia's Kahler Hall for Liz Bobo's final town hall meeting last week, they probably expected to hear the delegate talk (as she has for the past 19 years) about hot-button issues before the General Assembly, about her own legislative priorities — maybe, too, about the issues back home that concern her.But the evening closed on an unexpectedly emotional note as Bobo, a Columbia Democrat, bid farewell to her audience of friends and constituents. (Balt. Sun)

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Top court: Release doesn’t affect plaintiff’s UIM policy

An injured automobile passenger who settles with the driver’s insurance company can still seek underinsured motorist coverage from her own insurer, Maryland’s top court unanimously ruled Tuesday. The Court of Appeals said the underinsured motorist statute — Section 19-51(e) of the Insurance Article — was intended and plainly written to make sure that motorists and passengers injured on the state’s roads can receive compensation from their own insurer if the responsible party’s coverage falls short. (Daily Record)

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March 6 // GAO to review state-based health exchanges

The U.S. Government Accountability Office said Wednesday it is planning to examine state-based health insurance exchanges created under the Affordable Care Act, a move that could lead to a review of Maryland's troubled website. In a letter to Republican lawmakers on Capitol Hill, the nonpartisan investigative arm of Congress wrote that it would pursue a review of Oregon's exchange and that the effort would be folded into "a broader study planned to examine states' health exchange websites." (Balt. Sun)

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Price of Maryland’s Purple Line hits $2.37 billion, almost twice initial estimate for rail link

The estimated cost of building a light-rail Purple Line in the Maryland suburbs has risen by $220 million, making the project’s new price tag of $2.37 billion almost double initial projections, according to a federal report released Wednesday. Maryland transit officials have attributed previous cost increases to refining the rail line’s design — the route between Bethesda and New Carrollton grew early on from 14 miles to 16 miles — and taking inflation into account. (Wash. Post)

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