Council member seeks to slash Baltimore speed limits to save pedestrians

Drivers would have to slow down to 25 mph on Baltimore’s main thoroughfares under a proposal from a City Council member who wants to protect pedestrians from what he calls a “lethal environment.” The bill that Ryan Dorsey introduced Monday at the council’s meeting would also impose a 20 mph limit on side streets. It’s supported by 10 of the council’s 15 members. (Balt. Sun)

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More than $2 million in federal grants awarded to protect Chesapeake Bay

Congressman John Sarbanes announced on Monday that the Maryland Department of the Environment will receive over $2 million from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to help reduce nutrient and sediment pollution across the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The grants are being funded by the Chesapeake Bay Program, a partnership between the federal government and every state along the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. (WMAR-TV)

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STDs such as syphilis and gonorrhea rising rapidly in Maryland

The number of people with sexually transmitted diseases in Maryland is growing rapidly and many might not even know they are infected, fueling the spread. The rise in STDs is happening across the state and not just in trouble spots such as Baltimore, which has a history of high rates. The spread of syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia are of particular concern to public health officials and doctors, who say they are treating many more cases. (Balt. Sun)

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New high tech 'Smart Cans' hope to make trash collection better and easier

Baltimore Sanitation workers are getting some help taking out the trash, and it comes in the form of 'smart trash cans'. Just like smart cars, smart houses, and of course smartphones, smart trash cans also are designed to make garbage collecting better and easier. Earlier this year, Baltimore awarded a $15 million contract to a Korean company to install 4,000 smart cans in the city. (WMAR-TV)

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Salisbury estimates 60K attended first Folk Festival

Despite rainy conditions, city officials and event organizers estimate more than 60,000 people attended the inaugural National Folk Festival in Salisbury. From Sept. 7-9, downtown Salisbury hosted its first National Folk Festival – a free, outdoor event produced by the National Council for the Traditional Arts (NCTA) that celebrates arts, culture and heritage through live performances, workshops, demonstrations, children’s activities and more. (Dispatch)

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Salisbury Post Office to be named in honor of Sgt. Maj. Wardell Turner

A Salisbury post office will be named in honor of Sgt. Maj. Wardell B. Turner, a Wicomico County native who was killed in action in Afghanistan. Turner was deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and assigned to Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan when he and another soldier, Spc. Joey Riley, were killed in an improvised explosive device attack in 2014. (Daily Times)

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September 17 // Judge rejects bid to block Md. bump-stock ban from taking effect

Maryland’s recently enacted ban on attachments that enable guns to fire more rapidly will go into effect as scheduled Oct. 1 after a federal judge Friday rejected a bid from gun-rights advocates to block enforcement of the law while its constitutionality remains in litigation. Chief U.S. District Judge James K. Bredar said the law’s taking effect will not “irreparably harm” those possessing what are popularly called bump stocks because the statute grants them a one-year waiver from the ban by simply applying for permission from the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. (Daily Record)

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Baltimore police fitness 'boot camp' among new efforts to boost recruitment

For Delores Bell, the situps were the most challenging. As a Baltimore police recruit, she had to complete 29 in one minute, along with 10 pushups in a minute and a 1.5-mile run in under 16 minutes, 28 seconds to pass the fitness test. While she passed, the 26-year-old social worker from Baltimore said she wants to get in better shape before joining the force. She’s taking advantage of a new “Fit to Serve” boot camp, which the city launched as a pilot program this summer. It is one of several initiatives Mayor Catherine Pugh’s administration is rolling out to attract more recruits, including local, minority and female candidates. (Balt. Sun)

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