University of Maryland hospitals paid $127 million to Whiting-Turner, whose executives sit on their boards

The University of Maryland Medical System and affiliated hospitals have paid at least $127 million since 2012 to a construction company led by an executive who has been a board member at the health network’s affiliated medical school and flagship hospital, according to records reviewed by The Baltimore Sun. The Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. has ranked as the medical system’s top-paid independent contractor in three of the past eight years — primarily for construction projects it managed at the University of Maryland Medical Center and the university’s medical school, according to tax forms that include newly released documents for last year. Whiting-Turner CEO Timothy J. Regan is vice chairman of the medical center’s board. (Balt. Sun)

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Maryland Board of Public Works approves $9.8M upgrade along North Avenue bus route in Baltimore

Maryland’s spending panel on Wednesday unanimously approved a $9.8 million upgrade to the bus route along Baltimore’s North Avenue. The Board of Public Works voted 3-0 to make award a $9.8 million contract to Baltimore firm P. Flanigan & Sons Inc. to make “various improvements” along North Avenue between Hilton Parkway and North Rose Street as part of a joint venture between the Maryland Transit Administration and the Baltimore Department of Transportation. (Balt. Sun)

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What will it take to transform Baltimore’s anemic IT?

City leaders vowed after the May 7 ransomware attack on Baltimore that the city’s IT would not only recover, but return stronger than ever. But what, beyond boosting the budget for the Baltimore Office of Information & Technology, must they do to ensure the money is well-spent and city IT is not only hardened against crooks but made more functional for citizens? “It’s going to require more than just investment. It’s going to require a holistic view. It’s going to require a view across all the city’s agencies and a reckoning with 20 years of crud – information technology crud – that’s out there,” says tech journalist Sean Gallagher in Part 2 of his interview with The Brew. (Brew)

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Schmuck: What exactly happened at the Preakness starting gate with Bodexpress?

Since life is not fair, few will remember 10 years from now that on May 18, 2019, War of Will won the 144th Preakness. The indelible memory of Saturday’s big race at Pimlico Race Course will be the frightening gate accident that sent jockey John Velazquez hurtling through the air and a riderless Bodexpress running alongside the rest of the field during the second jewel of horse racing’s Triple Crown series. War of Will ended up with the big money, but Bodexpress ended up being a national internet hero. (Balt. Sun)

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Frederick to Montgomery Via Monorail? Not Goofy At All, Developer Says

A Montgomery County developer who made money over a long successful career hopes to convince top state officials that the future of transportation — not just here, but across the country — includes a mode of travel that many Americans regard as too “niche” to have large scale value. Robert O. Eisinger, managing partner of a real estate firm headquartered just off bustling Interstate 270 in North Rockville, is brimming with enthusiasm about the potential to move large numbers of commuters efficiently, safely and inexpensively via monorail, the same technology that many people have used at theme parks, airports and overseas. (Md. Matters)

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Marylanders traveling for Memorial Day expected to rise

The number of Marylanders expected to travel over Memorial Day weekend this year is at its highest point to date, AAA Mid-Atlantic estimates. An estimated 918,000 people will travel at least 50 miles on more between Thursday, May 23 and Monday, May 27. The figure marks a 3.4 percent increase over last year, and is the highest forecast AAA started tracking holiday travel in 2000. It is also the fifth consecutive year the state's travel volume over the holiday weekend is expected to exceed 800,000. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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'Left in dilapidated ghettos:' Faces of the federal lawsuit against HACA, Annapolis

“Out daily.” Those are the keywords of a medical script Glenn Rogers, 55, has on his refrigerator. The doctor wrote those instructions, he said, “because being in here is killing me.” Rogers for years has been living in public housing managed by the Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis. But after moving to Morris H. Blum Senior Apartments — one of six public housing properties owned and operated by the housing authority — Rogers said in an interview with The Capital that his health took a turn for the worse. (Balt. Sun)

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Md. sees moderate fall in senior health rankings

Maryland’s ranking in UnitedHealthcare’s annual senior health report fell outside of the top 10, a sign of poor outcomes in some areas like obesity despite improvement in other areas, like more home health workers. The state placed 11th in UnitedHealthcare’s 2019 America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, a year after it placed 9th. The state has generally fallen between 9th and 15th in the rankings since 2013. The rankings look at more than 30 metrics in four broad determinants of health categories that can affect health outcomes for seniors. Those categories include behaviors, the environment and community, health policies and clinical care. (Daily Record)

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