Young, Harrison Cheer Officers, Protesters For Ensuring Rallies, Marches Remain Peaceful

altimore Mayor Bernard C. "Jack" Young and Police Commissioner Michael Harrison on Tuesday thanked police and protesters for their roles in ensuring Baltimore continues to avoid the chaotic scenes between civilians and law enforcement that have played out elsewhere. "I love seeing the energy and passion from so many young people while leading the city today," Young said during a news conference at police headquarters.  (WBAL)

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Coronavirus Response: Maryland Health Department Launching Campaign To Highlight Importance Of Contact Tracing

As the number of coronavirus cases in Maryland continues to climb, the state’s health department is launching a new campaign to educate people about the importance of contact tracing. The campaign aims to highlight how contact tracing, which involves identifying other people a person who tests positive for COVID-19 may have come into contact with, can help slow the spread of the virus, the department said in a news release. It will include public service announcements and social media posts, among other items. (WJZ-TV)

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This Maryland mayor has overseen his town’s virus response. Up next: National Guard deployment.

For the past 11 years, Jake Day knew this day was coming. He knew when he signed up for the Army National Guard that he would probably face deployment. That was back in 2009, before he was elected to the Salisbury City Council, before he was elected mayor, before he was elected to a second term, before the city he leads on Maryland’s Eastern Shore faced a crisis that would make national headlines. (Wash Post)

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Turns out, Baltimore's field hospital had a lot more capacity than was needed — so far

The emergency field hospital erected inside the Baltimore Convention Center is equipped to treat 250 coronavirus patients recovering at a time. Five weeks after its opening, it has treated fewer than 100 patients in total. The field hospital operation cost about $5 million to stand up, including about $1.2 million in rent and utilities, according to state records. On a recent day, data provided by Johns Hopkins showed just 16 of the hospital's 250 available beds were occupied. (Balt Bus Journal)

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Orioles Organization Says It Is Committed To ‘Advocate For Change’ In Wake Of Death Of George Floyd

The Baltimore Orioles on Tuesday said their organization is committed to advocating for change for the country in the wake of the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died while in police custody in Minneapolis. “With enduring understanding, empathy, and a peaceful resolve, we are committed to advocate for the change our country needs today and to root out racism and prejudice of any kind as we strive to make a better America in the future,” the team wrote on Twitter. (WJZ-TV)

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Art Museums Across The Country Can Now Sell Their Pieces To Stay Afloat Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

For the first time, art museums struggling during the COVID-19 pandemic can now sell their art to stay afloat. For years, art museums have operated under a rule not to sell pieces to pay the bills. “The policy rests on the idea that art, we hold and trust these collections for the public, and it’s sort of our sacred value that we preserve them for generations to come,” Christopher Bedford, Baltimore Museum of Art Director, said. (WJZ-TV)

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Amid Baltimore Protests, Young Girl Hugs Officers In Riot Gear

A sweet exchange was captured on camera during the protests Monday in Baltimore. WJZ’s Kelsey Kushner, who was downtown covering the protests at City Hall, saw this moment in front of her eyes. A young girl waved at then walked over to a police officer dressed in riot gear and gave him a hug. Then she hugged several other officers. (WJZ-TV)

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Baltimore County sees largest single-day jump in coronavirus cases on Monday

Baltimore County added 234 new coronavirus cases and four new deaths between May 31 and June 1, the largest single-day jump in confirmed cases since the Maryland health department began releasing data in mid-March. As of Monday 6,299 county residents, or an average of 7.6 people for every 1,000 residents, have tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. And 333 county residents have died from the disease or complications from it. (Balt Sun)

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