Nov. 14 // Teachers feel unprepared for new Common Core curriculum, tests, survey finds

A survey of 745 Maryland teachers shows that two-thirds of teachers (65%) don’t feel prepared to implement the new Common Core curriculum, which was introduced in public schools this fall. And almost nine out of 10 (88%) answered there are still significant challenges to understanding and implementing new evaluation systems that measure progress on teaching Common Core. (Md. Reporter)

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Hopkins halfway to $4.5 billion fundraising goal

Johns Hopkins is more than halfway to its $4.5 billion fundraising goal, the university announced Wednesday, with the money helping to support initiatives that include urban revitalization and global health. More than 162,000 donors have helped Hopkins meet the halfway mark earlier than officials had previously expected, in spring 2014. The $4.5 billion fundraising goal is among the biggest such efforts in the country and the largest for the Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Hospital. (Balt. Sun)

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Local colleges and universities see endowment gains, better investment portfolio performance

A rising stock market is pushing up the value of the endowments at colleges and universities in the Baltimore area. Goucher College, Loyola University Maryland, Johns Hopkins University and Maryland Institute College of Art have each seen their endowments grow by double digits in 2013, a year in which the Dow Jones Industrial Average has risen by more than 35 percent. They’ve also been able to ride that wave of improved stock performance to strong gains in their investment portfolios. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Howard schools' health and wellness changes 'smooth' so far

Students at Hammond High School may have noticed something different about their school this year. Like all other schools in the Howard County Public School System, Hammond implemented changes to improve the health and wellness of its students. The biggest, most noticeable difference, said Hammond Principal Marci Leonard, is what's available in the student vending machines — the options are looking healthier. (Balt. Sun)

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Rockville, Wheaton school renovation and expansion projects could be delayed

Plans to build a new elementary school in Rockville remain on track, but some other renovation projects will likely be delayed, according to a proposal before the Board of Education. Superintendent Joshua P. Starr debuted his proposed Capital Improvements Program plan late last month. The plan covers building and renovation projects throughout the district over the next five years. The proposal delays 20 renovation projects in the school system by one to two years. Starr cited fiscal constraints and a lack of state funding as the reasons for delaying some of the projects. (Gazette)

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New Oxon Hill High: 'It is becoming the school we imagined'

The new $92 million school, which opened in August, has been touted as a high-tech facility that will connect with students living in a technological age. McCoy and other students said the new technology has motivated them to perform well. Not every tool is set up yet, but the students received Google Chromebooks, laptops using the Google operating system, on Nov. 11. (Gazette)

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Roaches, rats, leaky ceilings in Montgomery Co. schools

Students and parents in Montgomery County are using public hearings this week to demand funding, pointing to shocking conditions inside a number of local schools. "We have roaches, rats, maggots and other unacceptable creatures in our school," Damascus High School senior Morgan Johnson told board members Monday. "The ceiling leaks every time it rains." The Montgomery County Board of Education is hearing testimony on Superintendent Joshua P. Starr's proposed budget for upcoming capital improvements. (WTOP)

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Anne Arundel Community College enrollment down, but decline less than anticipated

Fall enrollment at Anne Arundel Community College has dipped 6.7 percent over the last year, less than officials originally feared, school leaders said Tuesday night. Felicia L. Patterson, AACC’s vice president of learner support services, said enrollment dropped from 17,650 full- and part-time students in fall 2012 to 16,463 students this fall. Enrollment was 17,957 in fall 2011. (Capital)

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