Local tax hike could drive extra $145 million to Anne Arundel schools, state experts say

Anne Arundel County could generate an additional $145 million every year by imposing the maximum local income tax rate — 3.2 percent — like neighboring Prince George’s, Montgomery and Howard counties, said policy experts from the Department of Legislative Services. Local delegates serving on Anne Arundel County’s education subcommittee discussed state aid at a Monday afternoon hearing. Anne Arundel has the third-lowest local income tax rate in the state at 2.5 percent. Del. Sandy Bartlett, committee chair, said the issue of tax hikes will be on the table for lawmakers in one of the state’s most fiscally conservative jurisdictions. (Capital)

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‘A huge weight off of my shoulders’: Virginia church pays Howard students’ debt

Mya Thompson doesn’t get much sleep. The 25-year-old senior is enrolled in seven classes at Howard University. Some days, she has class from 10 a.m. until 7 p.m., with only enough time to pick up her 6-year-old son, Ma’Khi, from school and to eat before her overnight shift as a dispatcher for D.C. 911 emergency services. She has to choose between eating, sleeping or studying during her limited breaks. Thompson arrives home before dawn — 5 a.m., maybe 6 a.m., depending on how busy work is — and sleeps for a few hours before repeating the routine. (Wash. Post)

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Former military hospital in Baltimore near Hopkins campus to get new life as academic center

Johns Hopkins University now plans to make over a 1930s-era hospital building on the edge of its Homewood campus that was originally established by Congress to care for sick and disabled seamen for academic purposes. The building, originally the 290-bed Baltimore Marine Hospital, has served many public, private, university purposes over the decades. It was marked for demolition at one point to make way for several Hopkins health system buildings, but university officials now say they plan to keep the structure. (Balt. Sun)

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Can the acting chancellor of D.C. Public Schools earn your trust? He’s going to try.

Lewis D. Ferebee has questions. What method are you using to solve those algebra problems? Is this neighborhood still considered Capitol Hill? What improvements do you want to see in your school? The mayor’s nominee to lead D.C. Public Schools — who has been serving as acting chancellor for nearly a month — is trying to deftly navigate the city’s bumpy education terrain as he prepares for the D.C. Council to decide his fate. A pivotal moment arrives Tuesday, when Ferebee is expected to be questioned by the council during the third and final public hearing on his nomination. (Wash. Post)

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Eastern Shore Community College to do three-year 'reboot'

Results of a state study of Eastern Shore Community College are in — along with recommendations for changes to make over the next three years. “The bottom line is that we believe the assessment offers a fair and thorough look at where ESCC stands today and, more importantly, provides an encouraging road map to take going forward,” said Jeff Holland, Board of Directors chairman, in a letter to faculty, staff, board members and supporters. (Daily Times)

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Parents say they pulled their children out of FCPS over dyslexia intervention shortcomings

Jamie Aliveto, FCPS director of system accountability and school improvement, said the system is going into this issue with “eyes wide open,” recognizing where they fall short in meeting the needs of students with dyslexia, dysgraphia and dyscalculia, addressing the challenge head-on and aiming to be transparent throughout the process. Next, FCPS will add two new grant-funded positions, an academic language specialist and teacher specialist for intensive literacy intervention, and more high-quality training. (News-Post)

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Maryland universities grapple with racist photos in yearbooks

The racist images that roiled Virginia’s political landscape this week have forced some self-reflection within the walls of Maryland’s colleges and universities, with the president of the state’s flagship school acknowledging that such images are sprinkled throughout the pages of the Terrapin yearbooks from the 1960s and '70s. These images of blackface, nooses and KKK robes shouldn’t come as a surprise, historians and sociologists say. (Balt. Sun)

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Greenebaum foundation gives $8 million to McDonogh School

McDonogh School has received $8 million, its second largest philanthropic gift ever, toward building a new middle school. The gift is from the Stewart and Marlene Greenebaum Family Foundation, which challenged other donors and community members to raise the remaining $17 million cost of the new building. The couple’s son, Michael Greenebaum, is a trustee and parent of students at the Owings Mills school. The building that currently houses the middle school was built in 1937, McDonogh Head of School David J. Farace said in a statement. (Balt. Sun)

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