Morgan State unveils football coaches' statues at new Legends Plaza

Before a celebratory gathering outside Hughes Stadium, Morgan State officials removed the tarpaulins shrouding two 6-foot bronze statues. Welcome back, Earl Banks and Eddie Hurt. The sculptures of the college’s two iconic football coaches are the first to christen Legends Plaza, a commons area overlooking the football field. Both men led the Bears to greatness. (Balt. Sun)

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Library wins $11K food literacy grant

The Institute of Museum and Library Services has awarded the Worcester County Library $11,000 to implement educational programs and kits that will promote healthy eating and wellness. Jennifer Ranck, the library’s director, said the Worcester County Library applied for a Food Literacy Series grant in response to a growing public interest in nutrition and wellness. (Dispatch)

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Heat wave makes for muggy schools after air-conditioning is switched off

Hot, muggy classrooms greeted parents and students this week at a number of county schools that don’t have running air conditioning, despite summer-like temperatures. While all public schools in Montgomery County have A/C, about 70 have switched over to their heating systems in preparation for crisp October weather. It became uncomfortable this week when the mercury climbed to 85 degrees. (Bethesda)

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Baltimore Ravens, police ride along to reach youth in city schools

The Baltimore Ravens and the Baltimore City Police Department teamed up to reach the City’s youth. The kids got a nice surprise and also got to see a different side of the players and police. Quarterback Joe Flacco received a boisterous welcome along with his teammates, who stopped by several Baltimore City schools this week. (WJZ-TV)

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October 12 // Michael Martirano, 'a teacher, first and foremost'

In the Department of Education building, the office door of Howard County Public School System Interim Superintendent Michael Martirano is wide open. Two five-level bookshelves stand side-by-side, displaying dozens of yellow school buses, as well as family and students photos. “If I were to tell you this is a small representative sample of the total collection, you would probably think I was neurotic,” said Martirano, pointing to one of nearly 50 school buses. Martirano gazed over his school bus collection and straightened his wavy, multi-colored tie. If his tie or gray, camouflage-patterned socks didn’t grab your attention, Martirano’s bubbly personality did the trick. (Columbia Flier)

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UMBC and Johns Hopkins lead effort to extend viability of organs and body parts for transplant

When someone’s body parts are donated, it’s a life-or-death race against the clock as hearts, lungs, livers and hands rapidly deteriorate outside the body. A trio of engineering and transplant experts from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Johns Hopkins University are leading an effort to extend that time and possibly transform the science of transplantation. “When you take organs from a natural environment to a man-made one, survival time is short,” said Gymama Slaughter, a computer science and electrical engineering associate professor at UMBC. “What if we could buy time to save someone’s life?” (Balt. Sun)

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Popular after-school program reaches agreement with Justice Department

Federal officials have settled a discrimination complaint against a popular after-school child-care provider in the Washington suburbs, requiring measures to accommodate children with disabilities. Justice Department officials signed the agreement Tuesday with Bar-T Year Round Programs for Kids in Maryland’s Montgomery County amid allegations that it violated Title III of the Americans With Disabilities Act when it expelled a student who has autism spectrum disorder. The student’s parents alleged that Bar-T did not properly consider whether it could make reasonable modifications to the program that would allow the student to remain enrolled. The child was removed on the basis of disability-related behavior, they alleged. (Wash. Post)

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Board of Education votes to move to former North Carroll High School

Over a nearly four-hour meeting Wednesday, the Carroll County Public Schools Board of Education came to a consensus to send a letter agreeing to move to the former North Carroll High School after months of back-and-forth with county commissioners. The board also voted to amend the Capital Improvement Plan to include a concept that would phase in a renovation for the Carroll County Career and Technology Center over time, and to look at a K-8 concept or other grade configurations to possibly replace East Middle and William Winchester Elementary schools. (Carr. Co. Times)

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