Howard Community College students give Ellicott City businesses hurt by floods a new life online

When a massive flood swept through historic Ellicott City nearly three years ago, Main Street storefronts were destroyed and shops were gutted, causing several businesses to close and customers to look elsewhere. In the fall after the July 2016 flood, a team of Howard Community College students volunteered to help some of those businesses. The students, free of charge, took the brick-and-mortar shops and brought them online, building and updating websites, allowing the businesses to maintain a presence despite lackingdaily face-to-face interactions with customers. “The demographic of Ellicott City is the businesses enjoy being on a storefront,” said Liam Garrett, a former HCC student who is now a graphic design major at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. (Ho. Co. Times)

Read Full Article

Baltimore County schools scaling back ambitious laptop program that has met criticism

The Baltimore County public schools are scaling back an ambitious program that supplied laptops to every student, the first adjustments to a plan that began four years ago to much acclaim but hasn’t had much impact on student achievement. Beginning next fall, the school system will decrease the number of laptops available to students in the early grades, providing one device for every five first and second graders. The change will require teachers to adjust their lesson plans, according to Mary Boswell-McComas, the school district’s interim chief academic officer. The county also will switch from HP laptop to Chromebooks — far less expensive devices — in all its elementary schools. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Carroll Community College commencement speakers announced

The 26th commencement ceremony for Carroll Community College will bring Carroll Hospital President Leslie Simmons to address the graduates as their commencement speaker. Marta Cruz-Alicea, who will be receiving her Associate of Science in Nursing will give the Student Response on behalf of her fellow graduates. The ceremony takes place Wednesday, May 29 at 3 p.m. in the Gill Center on the campus of McDaniel College in Westminster. (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Change in how poverty is calculated has decreased funding for a Baltimore school

Four years ago, more than 90 percent of students at John Ruhrah Elementary/Middle School were identified as poor. This staggering poverty rate meant the federal government provided the Southeast Baltimore school with free fresh fruits and vegetables for schoolkids. New teachers could qualify for special loan forgiveness, and a bevy of grants were accessible. Perhaps most important, Ruhrah qualified for Title I, a federal program that directs resources to poor schools. Next year, Ruhrah will lose its Title I status and the nearly $250,000 attached to it. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Students at Annapolis High worry about future without robotics funding

In the weeks since County Executive Steuart Pittman released his $1.7 billion budget, students at Annapolis High School are wondering why funding for their robotics team was slashed. The Board of Education’s $40,000 request for high school robotics didn’t make it to Pittman’s proposal, which was revealed May 1. School board members advocated for the funding after hearing testimony from students across the county. Now, students in the Technology Student Association at Annapolis High worry the lack of funding will continue to deter other kids from joining the club — students are asked to pay $25 in dues. Natalie Hardin, 17, said students have complained the club is too “expensive.” (Balt. Sun)

Read Full Article

Businesses and universities team up on a new digital technology credential

Mike Fasil had much to celebrate when he graduated Friday alongside thousands of others from George Mason University. The son of Ethiopian immigrants and the first in his family to go to college, the 21-year-old from Northern Virginia received a bachelor’s degree in information systems and operations management. He minored in an increasingly popular subject, data analysis, and lined up a job as a business technology analyst. (Wash. Post)

Read Full Article

Washington County Public Schools teachers put imaginations on display

Local teachers didn’t hold back their imaginations for the annual Faculty Art Showcase on Sunday at Williamsport High School. Todd Geiman, lead visual-arts teacher at Barbara Ingram School for the Arts, unveiled a massive cardboard sculpture of a human head. It was carefully constructed to create life-like eyes, nose and a wide-open smile. Its bushy head of hair was made from shredded cardboard. (Herald Mail)

Read Full Article

Fresh criticism aimed at Maryland’s higher ed system after report on handling of campus outbreak

Before Maryland’s university system board of regents met in executive session Friday morning, board Chair Linda Gooden issued a statement in direct response to a report from The Washington Post. That story outlined how the University of Maryland waited 18 days before notifying students that there had been an outbreak of adenovirus on campus. In November, 18-year-old freshman Olivia Paregol died after contracting the virus at the school.Gooden’s written statement read, in part: “Along with the entire Board of Regents, I remain deeply saddened by the untimely passing of Olivia.” Gooden’s statement continued, “Let me be clear, student safety is the first order of leadership and the highest priority at all of our campuses.” (WTOP)

Read Full Article